400 Years New

Nestled upon a hill in the Tuscan countryside, this centuries-old farmhouse has been meticulously restored — merging 400 years of history with modern-day features.

With an original structure dating back to 1598, Podere Paníco features authentic wood beams, cotto flooring and roof tiles. Restoration architect Fulvio Di Rosa also purposefully hid modern infrastructure — such as plumbing, electrical, and insulation — to maintain a sense of authenticity throughout the home.

Additional, age-old building materials were sourced to maintain an historical presence. When encountering modern elements — such as indoor staircases, indoor lighting, or pools — Fulvio embraced contemporary materials to curate a luxurious touch as well.

“Fulvio has amazing attention to detail and a strict adherence to authenticity in the structural elements of the home,” says listing agent Bob Hurwitz of Hurwitz James Company. “Stonemasons and carpenters were tasked with problem solving using only methods and techniques available during the era of original construction.”

The abandoned property was rediscovered in 2013 with many of its beams and arches still intact. “What separates Paníco from other restorations, in addition to the unparalleled authenticity, is the open concept design that was achieved.… Paníco’s interior is spacious and light, with beautifully large, arched windows opening views in multiple directions from virtually anywhere in the home,” Hurwitz says. With over 7,000 square feet of living space, Paníco is the ideal setting for multiple families, corporate retreats, weddings, or any large gathering. Both homeowners and guests can relax in three distinct living areas — one on the main level, one on the upper level and one in the barn. Meanwhile, the open-concept kitchen with a traditional Tuscan fireplace allows for a range of culinary adventures. When you step outside of this one-of-a-kind home, you are greeted by unrivalled, sweeping vistas. “With its hilltop location, the 360-degree views from the property are amazing, particularly from the infinity pool,” Hurwitz says.

With a row of cypress trees that guide you up to the five-acre property, Paníco offers the utmost privacy, “with your only neighbors being other ruins in the distance and a herd of sheep that sometimes graze nearby,” says Hurwitz.

Located mere minutes from the historic streets of Siena, the location is another key selling point of this luxurious, Tuscan farmhouse. Hurwitz recommends that guests “spend the day exploring the classical and gothic architecture, the afternoon shopping in local markets, or [get] swept away with a romantic Italian dinner.”

“Pedal through the wide-open landscape of Crete Senesi, past ancient hilltop towns, brick farmhouses, iconic cypress trees, and lush vineyards. Then stop to savour delicious Pecorino cheeses, homemade pastas, fruity olive oils, and celebrated Tuscan wines,” adds Hurwitz.

This fantastically located home has more than 400 years of unique history, and once was even “used as a base of operations for the commander of the French army during the Allied campaign in Italy in WW ll,” according to Hurwtiz. More recently, the farmhouse served as home to countless families and animals. As the home is currently on the market, Hurwitz says that Paníco’s casual luxurious style will draw in large families in search of a first or second home. “Paníco also attracts affluent travelers and a high weekly rental rate, making it an ideal investment property,” he adds. “The quality and authenticity of the restoration will allow for maximum capital appreciation in the future.”

Photos by Marco Grillo.

New Zealand’s boutique luxury gem, The Marlborough Lodge, recently completed the property’s third stage of a four-stage renovation. The new additions feature a stand-alone spa, guest entertaining area with a bar, retail store, wine shack and other enhancements.

Just in time for New Zealand’s summer season, the new refurbishments and additions continue to add to the lodge’s unique appeal as a premier luxury lodge in the heart of the Marlborough wine region. One of New Zealand’s newest luxury lodges, The Marlborough Lodge offers the perfect basecamp to discover the bounty of Marlborough, a region rich in culture, nature, food and wine and more.

The Marlborough Lodge’s third stage of renovation centered on converting the on-site 1913 chapel into a small spa, guest entertaining area with bar and retail shop. The renovated chapel measures approximately 592 square feet, and the spa measures approximately 183 square feet. Open seven days a week by appointment, the spa menu focuses on offering massage treatments initially with plans for adding additional wellness treatments including facials, hair masks and other rejuvenation and relaxation treatments based on guests’ needs.

With deep green walls, Moroccan-inspired lighting, candles from New Zealand artisan makers Ashley & Co., and more, the spa interior evokes tranquility from the moment upon entering the room. Angela Dillon, co-owner and managing director of The Marlborough Lodge spearheaded the design and interiors of all the new spaces, taking her inspiration from the variety of textures and colors throughout the main lodge. The refurbished structure has been designed to flow on from the main house and fit with the lodge’s overall aesthetic and theme. Natural tones mix with the original chapel Rimu wood and exposed beams made from 100-year-old kauri wood.

Born and raised in New Zealand, Head Chef Sam Webb oversees the food and beverage offering at the lodge’s The Harvest Restaurant, open to lodge and non-lodge guests. Focusing on fresh, seasonal and locally-sourced produce, Head Chef Webb’s a la carte menus is complemented by a selection of wines with an emphasis on New Zealand, but includes an international selection. Guests can enjoy dining at the Chef’s Bench or taking a tour with the Chef through the lodge’s extensive vegetable and fruit garden, cooking demonstrations and more.

The lodge store carries products made from the Marlborough area working closely with local craftsmen and artisans with items such as bags, caps and clothing designed just for The Marlborough Lodge’s guests, while the new wooden wine shack across the creek offers the perfect space to enjoy private wine tastings from the plethora of extraordinary winemakers in the region.

Photos courtesy of Marlborough Lodge.

Bar Harbor, the summer stomping ground of elites such as John D. Rockefeller, Jr., J.P. Morgan, Cornelius Vanderbilt, the Astor family and President William Taft, is home to East of Eden — a mansion that survived a fire that destroyed most of the town in 1947.

One of Maine’s last Gilded Age mansions, East of Eden, is now for sale in Bar Harbor. The Gilded Age was a glittering era that took place after the American Civil War in the late 19th century, and was filled with economic growth from new technologies and new ways of organizing businesses. East of Eden, formerly known as Eegonos, was one of the few Gilded Age mansions in Bar Harbor that survived a fire in 1947 that destroyed most of the town. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.
With its picturesque New England coastline, it wasn’t too many years after the British settled the area in the late 1700s that the people of the upper class decided Bar Harbor — originally known as Eden — would be perfect for their summer retreats.
Bar Harbor was the summer stomping ground of elites such as John D. Rockefeller, Jr., J. P. Morgan, Cornelius Vanderbilt, the Astor family and President William Taft who enjoyed playing his golf there. Nelson Rockefeller was born in Bar Harbor and kept a home in nearby Seal Harbor for many years. Today, the resort town’s summer season is filled with film and television celebrities, writers, artists, lobster rolls, water sports and ordinary people enjoying the scenery and laid-back atmosphere.
Designed by Guy Lowell, the home is a blend of Beaux Arts and Mediterranean Revival style. Its 15,000-square-foot manse construction was completed in 1909. The 2.5 story house is positioned on nine private acres of waterfront with a deep-water dock to tie up a yacht or to enjoy the sunset. There is plenty of room for guests and extended family with fourteen-foot ceilings, eight bedrooms and twelve baths. Old world features include a large marble foyer, columned separations between major public rooms, fireplaces finished in marble and wood, ceilings with decorative friezes and medallions and hand-painted wall murals.
In addition its the detailed restoration, all mechanical systems have been updated. There is also an eight-bay garage to accommodate owners and overnight guests. East of Eden is a quick drive to Arcadia National Park and Bar Harbor’s restaurants and shops.
One of Maine’s few remaining Gilded Age mansions, The Knowles Company has listed East of Eden for $15.5 million.

Photos courtesy of The Knowles Company Realtors

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