Big Chill Brings Bold Colors

Prepare for holiday festivities, dinners, parties and more with a fresh boost to your kitchen, such as these new, professional-grade appliances by Big Chill. These inspired palettes and finishes are the splash of color that your kitchen needs. Impress family and guests this time of year with Big Chill’s enviable kitchen additions.

Big Chill was founded by Orion Creamer and uncle Thom Vernon in 2001 and made a splash with its brightly colored, retro-styled fridges with modern amenities. The international manufacturer has unveiled two new tiers of finish offerings.
 

 

The new Standard and Premium paint finishes are designed to enhance the unique character and aesthetic of each collection and are offered across all three of the brand’s product lines — Classic, PRO, and Retro. Elevated in style, each finish selection was conceived to match marketplace preferences and highlight superior color options that are preferred by designers, decorators, and renovation enthusiasts alike. 

“Since our conception, we’ve made colorful finish offerings our priority,” comments Big Chill Founder, Orion Creamer. “In offering two new tiers of paint finishes, in addition to our over 200 custom color options, we are aiming to assist in the design process, providing an accessible method for pairing each collection with paint finishes that make a mark.” 

Retro Collection: The collection that started it all, the Retro Collection offers crave-worthy details like a stamped metal body, chrome trim, and a pivoting handle to add charismatic charm reminiscent of the period which inspired its design. The Standard offering plays to this time period, with vibrant pastels available to cheer up kitchens of all shapes and sizes.

PRO Collection: The collection combines the best in present-day performance and contemporary design using crisp lines and an array of colors for an elevated, modern aesthetic. 

 

Classic Collection: Traditionally inspired, the collection’s appliances offer an aesthetic that asserts timeliness and luxury in the kitchen space curated with artfully worn and textured metals, sculpted handles, and turn-of-the-century knobs. 

Photos courtesy of Big Chill

Green Dreaming

The color green symbolises life, renewal, harmony and growth and is set to steal the limelight of new interior design concepts in the year ahead.

Give the Gift of Sustainability

Ethical and sustainable jewelry companies are adding some sparkle to the world of fashion.

Flowers & Diamonds

The delicate and fleeting beauty of nature has been preserved in Earth’s hardest natural substance resulting in the perfect combination of jewelry and flowers.

Sustainable Shoes and More by Nisolo

Nisolo, a sustainable fashion brand, shares its impact report online and offers everything from jewelry and accessories, to heels, boots, bags and more. This company focuses on more than low prices. The handcrafted process involves intentional designs, an ethical work environment, and comfortable fashion that can be worn every day.

A Guide to the Michelin Guide

Bvlgari Hotels & Resorts is proud to announce that both the hotel’s signature restaurants, the Italian Il Ristorante — Niko Romito and the Chinese Bao Li Xuan, have been awarded Michelin stars during the Michelin Guide Shanghai 2020 presentation ceremony.

The Art of Writing

Exclusive writing instruments elevate the tradition of putting pen to paper — a ritual technology cannot erase — into fine art

Bedding for a Cause

The Good Sheet, a luxury bedding brand based in Tasmania, Australia partnered with non-profit organization, One Tree Planted, is planting five trees in its home state of Tasmania with every bedding set sold.

Modern Midwestern Makes

These two Midwestern brands, both with a reputation for timeless design, craftsmanship, and innovation, will debut a new collection in January 2020.

Concrete-Inspired Gift Guide

Looking for inspiration this holiday season? Check out this gift guide with an edge. These concrete-inspired items are perfect for your home or office and will stand the test of time to celebrate for years to come.

Contemporary versus Farmhouse. Warm woods versus stark whites. The latest kitchens incorporate new ways of thinking.

 

By Camilla McLaughlin

 

The kitchen story continues to be painted in white and grey, but for luxury the narrative is changing. “When it comes to high-end luxury, it’s about quality. It’s about finishes, color and the wow factor,” says National Kitchen & Bath Association Industry Relations Manager Elle H-Millard, who is also a certified kitchen designer, noting that luxury continues to be more about the user experience.

 

There is no better place to scope out what’s ahead for kitchens than the industry’s annual trade event, the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show. Although the focus might be the overall kitchen market, many of the trends and innovations are ideally suited for the largest budgets and savviest design aspirations.

 

Still, Christopher Grubb, president of Arch-Interiors Design Group in Los Angeles, points out that luxury today speaks to multiple tiers in the market. “Luxury doesn’t have to be about cost. Luxury is an experience, and at every price level people want luxury finishes.”

 

White and grey remain the preferred color schemes according to the vast majority of design experts and industry professionals responding to NKBA’s annual trends survey. Still, anyone walking the KBIS show floor this January couldn’t help but notice that wood in medium to light tones was very much in evidence, either for cabinets — especially in contemporary designs — or as an accent. “I am seeing a lot of movement because grey and white have been so popular. I am seeing wood tones come back, which is kind of nice. We haven’t seen that in a while,” observes Grubb. The emergence of wood, either as a primary finish or as an element in a design scheme, reflects a subtle shift and growing desire to integrate an organic feeling.

 

Typically, styles gain or lose momentum over an interval of several years. This year, Farmhouse suddenly jumped to the top in the NKBA survey with 79 percent of design professionals characterizing it as “trendy” or “very trendy.” This eclectic style mixes white with warm metals and mellow weathered wood. Reclaimed wood beams and hardwood flooring along with barn doors and apron sinks enhance the Farmhouse sensibility.

 

Transitional, which combines clean lines and streamlined traditional details, was the second most preferred style. Main elements of this style include quartz countertops and wood floors.

 

Overall, for countertops in every style, H-Millard says, “quartz is where it’s at today;” 94 percent of professionals surveyed agree. Hardwood was the preferred flooring, according to 78 percent of respondents.

 

Contemporary, defined by linear forms with flat-front doors and frameless cabinets, followed as the third-most-preferred style. Hallmarks include open shelving, clean lines and appliances that meld into cabinets. It’s important to note the narrow spread in the survey between Farmhouse at 79 percent and Contemporary at 73 percent.

 

Dark tones continue to find their way into kitchens in faucets, hardware and cabinets, sometimes as a contrast with white. For cabinets, blue is emerging, and black is gaining traction for both faucets and cabinets. Glossy finishes are out; matte is trending. A matte surface, combined with processes that highlight grain and create a textural finish, imparts softness and depth that creates almost a tactile sense. It’s not an overstatement to call this “the new black.”

 

The desire for customized storage shifts more attention to what’s inside cabinets and drawers, especially in the high end. Every year manufacturers expand the number of inserts and products designed to enhance organization, meet everyday cooking requirements and adapt kitchens for a range of cuisines, special interests and abilities.

 

“One of the things that came out of the luxury custom movement is really creating an experience for the user,” says H-Millard, who sees more and more companies tapping into the human touch, offering ways to customize products.

 

This year, Elkay introduced an option offering various front panels for their farmhouse sinks, which allows consumers to change the look of the sink. Pops of color are another hallmark of high-end kitchens, and H-Millard says a growing trend is the use of bold colors to make large gas ranges the focal point of a kitchen. Often too, manufacturers give consumers ways to change the look with panels in multiple colors that can be switched out. “They are making new colors every year. There are so many options to choose from in bold pops of colors, everything from knobs, materials and finishes. That alone is really kicking the personalizer for the user experience to a whole new level,” explains H-Millard.

 

For refrigerators, Tami Catalano, sales consultant with Monark Tucson Showroom, says it’s about “columns, columns and more columns. We have just about every brand offering columns now. It’s about who can dress them up more, be more flexible or offer the most competitive price point.” Having the option to create whatever configuration a homeowner desires and seamlessly integrate it into a custom design completely personalizes this appliance. Manufacturers continue to offer new takes on stainless, but Grubb says for high-end kitchens typically the choice is a paneled finish that matches the cabinets, so the appliances blend in and make the kitchen appear larger.

 

Sinks are on the cusp of morphing into the most versatile product in the kitchen. Not only are large format styles in demand, but manufacturers offer many ways to configure a sink along with accessories that maximize function. Often a sink can be combined with under-cabinet refrigeration. An induction burner adds an option to cook pasta or lobster next to the sink. Multiple bowls also make the sink a spot to ice drinks or seafood. H-Millard says, “This is a whole new way of thinking, which will drive new traffic patterns in the kitchen.” Even the traditional work triangle is being tweaked by large islands. A standard U- or L-shaped plan is now focused on the island, and H-Millard expects this to change the configuration of cabinetry. “It is also going to change how people look at functionality in their kitchens,” she says. Mid-height cabinets should gain traction.

 

For next-generation kitchens, look for a growing interest in wellness and freshness to spark a new wave of innovations.  

 

Photos courtesy of Laurent Levant Interior / Dave Bryce Photography, istockphoto.com / Hikesterson, Taryn Emerson Interiors / Jared Bumgarner, Haffle America Co., Mike Tuell, Arch Interiors / Greg Weiner Photography

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2017 edition of The High End magazine. For more information about The High End, click here.

Suddenly obsessed with coffee, Americans are becoming as selective about the quality of their beans, equipment and tableware as their counterparts in Italy. 

By Roger Grody

Tom Dixon Brew Cafetiere

Kees van der Westen Speedster

Lux/Eros espresso cup and saucer

Photo courtesy Consort-Design.com

As luxury homeowners increasingly desire to master their own barista skills, demand for high-end products for home kitchens is skyrocketing. Coffee aficionados now enjoy many ways of transforming an ordinary cup of Joe into a work of art. 

Handcrafted in Florence, Italy, La Marzocco espresso machines are coveted by professional baristas worldwide, and the company’s Linea Mini ($4,500) is specifically designed for the home. “With the introduction of Linea Mini, we now have a professional-quality machine for anyone interested in creating a café experience in their kitchen,” says Kent Bakke, CEO of La Marzocco International. With a design based on the iconic La Marzocco machines used by the pros, this version is compact (i.e. counter-friendly) and turns out a perfect latte. 

Slayer Espresso has earned a cult-like following that appreciates both the performance and aesthetics of its espresso machines. The Slayer Single Group, the company’s model for the home, features dual boilers and a touchscreen that assists in temperature control and flavor profiling, resulting in espresso with great body and a rich crema. Peruvian walnut accents and custom colors or finishes give this machine the sexy looks of an Italian sports car, yet is built by artisans in Seattle. The hefty price tag of $8,500 is no deterrent to those who have a passion for espresso. “Let’s face it, espresso equipment options have been around for a long time and everyone has some form of so-called espresso maker in their gadget collection,” says Slayer Espresso founder and CEO Jason Prefontaine. “Trust me, our espresso machine with flavor profiling, needle valve technology will forever change your coffee ritual…. Don’t be surprised if you end up loving coffee like we do,” he adds.

An exclusive Dutch brand renowned for its edgy industrial designs, Kees van der Westen offers the Speedster for home use, loaded with bespoke options. Inspired by automotive and motorcycle construction, this pricy toy (approximately $13,000) delivers professional-quality espresso drinks and will definitely be noticed by your guests. 

Coffee is not simply about roasted beans and steamed milk, so luxurious accoutrements are essential. The MOOD collection by Christofle, the venerable French manufacturer of elegant tableware and accessories, presents a set of six espresso spoons — clad in silver ($360) or gilded in 18-carat rose gold ($650) — in a gleaming egg-shaped chest. These spoons are just the kind of accessories to elevate any perfectly crafted cup of espresso. 

Among other fashionable coffee-related accessories, British designer Tom Dixon has created this cafetière, more commonly referred to as a French press. With a modern unfussy aesthetic, the gleaming copper-finished stainless steel body is classic Dixon, and its heat-resistant handle is artfully functional. Many connoisseurs believe the best way to enjoy coffee at home — short of purchasing one of the espresso machines featured on these pages — is by small-batch brewing in one of these low-tech devices. Besides, setting a French press on a dinner party table quietly announces a host’s sense of sophistication and elegance. This product ($210) is available at British online retailer Amara, where founder/creative director Sam Hood has assembled an international collection of designer accessories for the home.

Unique espresso cups and saucers ($50) by Lux/Eros, the ceramics brand from designer Desanka Fasiska, feature an elegant rusticity. They are hand-carved and hand-glazed to order in California, with no two pieces being identical. Distinguished by their high-gloss 90-degree angle handles, these products are available at Consort stores in New York and L.A., or online. 

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