Las Vegas Luxury Living

1701 Enclave Court

Las Vegas, Nevada 89134

4 Bedrooms, 8 Bathrooms, 13,349 Square Feet, $12,950,000

Inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water, this legacy property located in the prestigious Enclave of Summerlin is perfect for entertaining guests and family. Comprised of over 2,200 tons of ledge stone, this 13,000-plus-square-foot home sits on 2 acres of the private TPC course. This home’s amazing gardens and waterfalls run throughout the property, and not only serve as the centerpiece of this palatial home but provide a constant reminder of the true uniqueness of this home in the desert. Impressive vaulted-box, exposed-beam ceilings with recessed lighting adorn much of the home. For entertaining guests and family, this home boasts a great room, family room, formal dining room, wet bar, and wine cellar/home theater. This Las Vegas home offers both character and significance unmatched in the valley.

For more information, contact:

Don Kuhl

Principal – KUHL Group

Synergy | Sotheby’s International Realty

C: 702.324.2121 O: 702.360.1414 

Photos courtesy of Le Bernadin

Overall, Americans are shunning haute cuisine, but for elite diners there remain plenty of opportunities for conspicuous consumption.

 

By Roger Grody

 

Generally, “fine dining” — typically evidenced by crisp white tablecloths, crystal stemware and formal service — is rapidly disappearing in America. However, for those restaurants that stubbornly adhere to tradition and insist on genuine luxury, the experience is elevated … along with the price.

 

Charlie Trotter, the renowned Chicago chef who died in his prime, insisted that fine dining actually represents good value, citing the superb ingredients and intensive labor (100 people from farmers to servers) that contribute to a world-class meal. Average Americans cannot afford mansions or yachts, but many can occasionally experience the world’s finest cuisine. The restaurants featured herein honor Trotter’s philosophy, with some pushing his principle to its limits.

 

Le Bernardin is one of New York’s temples of gastronomy, where chef/partner Éric Ripert has earned acclaim for fresh, seasonable seafood enhanced through sophisticated French technique. With options between $170 and $225 per person, the prix fixe menus at Le Bernardin are actually restrained for a Michelin three-star restaurant, but a couple can drop a bundle once caviar and wine are added.

 

“Luxurious service no longer equates to the stiff environment with formulaic interactions that was once popular,” reports Ripert, and while Le Bernardin has pioneered a more approachable experience, the chef/restaurateur still values tradition. “We continue to be a destination for special occasions, which is a large part of why we uphold some of our more classical dining requirements, such as gentleman wearing jackets,” he says. Allowing guests to visit the kitchen and take photographs with staff might not have been something his mentor Joël Robuchon would have encouraged decades ago, but Ripert views it as part of the evolution of fine dining.

 

While French cooking has the reputation for being the most expensive, it is Japanese cuisine — particularly the art of sushi — that is the priciest in America today. Discretely tucked into a diminutive space on Beverly Hills’ Rodeo Drive is Urasawa, whose entire seating is essentially comprised of just eight chairs at a sushi bar. There, for a flat fee of $425 per person (before tax, tip or a drop of sake), sushi chef Hiroyuki Urasawa personally pampers guests with an omakase (chef’s choice) meal in which extraordinary ingredients are matched by artistry on the plate.

Photos by Allen Hemberger, interior by Matthew Gilson

Urasawa-san is a protégé of sushi chef Masayoshi “Masa” Takayama, whose own restaurant previously occupied that same Beverly Hills space. When Takayama was lured to New York to open his 26-seat Masa at Time Warner Center, the prices went up and are now $595 per person, although gratuities are not accepted.

 

Masa’s sushi bar, a solid piece of hinoki (Japanese cypress), is sanded daily to create a luxurious tactile surface, while flowering branches of seasonal plants provide the only distraction from the master’s work behind the counter. A procession of glistening, edible jewels — the exquisite plating includes ample caviar, truffles and uni — comprise an unforgettable two dozen-course feast that most believe is worth the price.

 

Alinea, the renowned flagship of culinary innovator Grant Achatz, is sometimes mistakenly viewed as an elaborate stage for the chef/owner’s bag of molecular gastronomical tricks, but innovation alone does not earn three Michelin stars. While the interactivity and playfulness of the cuisine may turn off traditionalists who insist on the hushed formality of what typically passes for fine dining, the sophistication of Achatz’s ingredients, imagination and technique is undeniable. The price for this carefully choreographed presentation of culinary and performance art can reach $385 per person, prior to making a wine selection.

 

While acknowledging the “absurdity” of paying so much for a meal, Jeff Ruby, chief dining critic at Chicago magazine, insists the Alinea experience is a sound investment. “Someday, Alinea will be gone, and people will speak of it with awe, and its legend will grow,” he says. “Like people who brag that they saw Michael Jordan play in his prime, you can say you ate at Alinea. That is worth way more than $385 to me.”

 

Ruby believes even traditionalists can find pleasure with Achatz’s concept, as long as they go with an open mind. “People walk in with a chip on their shoulders and Alinea knocks the chip off and turns it into some kind of dehydrated truffle orb,” quips Ruby, insisting Achatz and his crew deliver on their promise night after night.

 

Located in a posh hotel 20 miles north of downtown San Diego is Addison, where 22-karat gold-trimmed doors open into a soaring foyer while four limestone fireplaces warm the classically inspired premises. In the kitchen, Executive Chef William Bradley prepares a contemporary French cuisine while $10,000-plus treasures are stocked in the wine cellar. Although the chef’s 10-course tasting menu is a relatively manageable $250, Addison recently hosted a Krug Champagne dinner that at $1,000 per head is extravagant by any standard.

 

“At Addison, every element is fine-tuned through the lens of creating the best and most memorable dining experience possible for our guests from the moment they walk through the door,” reports Bradley. Noting that many diners are celebrating special occasions or have traveled a great distance, he adds that small details (e.g. generously spaced tables, stools for ladies’ purses) are the foundation of the guest experience.

Photos courtesy of Tory Kooyman and Jakob N. Layman

“Hospitality is timeless, as is the desire to be transported,” says Bradley, noting that the dining experience at Addison — it is tucked away in the hills above Del Mar — echoes its physical separation from metropolitan San Diego or L.A. “In an era where we’re so connected to technology, it’s more important than ever to maintain fine dining traditions that separate our guests from the stress of their daily routines,” suggests the chef.

 

Addison’s bar is currently dispensing a $250 cocktail called the Corpse Reviver XIII, a reimagination of a classic libation with roots in the 19th century. This gold dust-embellished version contains Adrien Camut Rareté (a Calvados so rare only 10 bottles are allocated to the U.S. annually) and 40-year-aged Rémy Martin Louis XIII Cognac. With its price equivalent to the tasting menu, this is clearly an indulgence worth lingering over.

 

In San Francisco, Saison ranks as the most exclusive and expensive restaurant in town, where exquisitely presented contemporary American fare is served in a space where the boundaries between dining room and kitchen are all but erased. A procession of nearly 20 small courses, which changes daily and can be tailored to the preferences of individual diners, carries a tariff of $398 —before even exploring Saison’s world-class wine list.

 

In Las Vegas, where winners and losers alike are as predisposed to consume opulent cuisine as they are to purchase Louis Vuitton bags, every major hotel has at least one ultra-high-end dining room. At Caesar’s Palace it is the eponymous restaurant of Guy Savoy, one of Paris’ Michelin three-star stalwarts, where the “Prestige Tasting Menu” runs $385 per person and premium wine pairings add another $375.

 

At Twist, a celebrated dining venue at the Mandarin Oriental Las Vegas, Chef Pierre Gagnaire (another giant of the Parisian dining scene) presents what may be the luckiest menu on the city’s legendary Strip. A seven-course meal is paired with seven fine wines to comprise a memorable gastronomic experience, and hopefully its $777 per person investment can be recouped with some additional sevens in a nearby casino.

 

At the Mandalay Bay’s Fleur in Las Vegas, even the ultimate comfort food can inflict extensive damage to one’s budget. There, chef/owner Hubert Keller applies the city’s legendary glam to the humble hamburger, layering foie gras and truffles over a wagyu beef patty. It arrives with a bottle of 1995 Château Pétrus, one of the world’s most treasured wines, followed by a $5,000 tab. 

Photos by Bonjwing Lee

Addison San Diego www.addisondelmar.com

Alinea Chicago www.alinearestaurant.com

Fleur by Hubert Keller Las Vegas www.hubertkeller.com

Restaurant Guy Savoy Las Vegas www.caesars.com

Le Bernardin New York www.le-bernardin.com

Masa New York www.masanyc.com

Saison San Francisco www.saisonsf.com

Twist Las Vegas www.mandarinoriental.com/las-vegas

Urasawa Beverly Hills http://urasawa.cafe-inspector.com

Inventories, demand, new construction, urban renewal, untapped potential and changing business opportunities. All of this and much more vary greatly from region to region, market to market, and submarket to submarket. We took it all into account as we determined which 18 places most warrant keeping an eye on in 2018.

By Camilla McLaughlin

Atlanta, Georgia — Midtown is on fire, the result of extensive redevelopment, and local experts believe downtown will become equally vital. Buckhead is still a locus for the high end, but new upscale buildings bring luxury to revitalized city neighborhoods. Look for more upscale communities in the suburbs as well.

Austin, Texas — Along with Atlanta, Austin is setting the pace for a new age for cities in the south. Technology, pharmaceutical and biotech industries coupled with a unique lifestyle bring newcomers. Not to be discounted is Texas’ status as a no-income-tax state. Californians will continue to look favorably on this city.

Boston, Massachusetts — New

ultra-luxury buildings have buffed Boston’s luxury patina. And the redevelopment of neighborhoods is creating more upscale addresses. Prices in the greater Boston area reached a new high in October with a $568,000 median. A steady influx of foreign investors and slightly more balanced inventory are expected to drive the market into 2018. 

Charleston, South Carolina — This city’s ascendancy to the luxury elite is undeniable. Christie’s ranks Charleston fifth, ahead of Paris and Sydney, on its Luxury Thermometer, based on demand and growth. Antebellum classics in historic sections still captivate, but enclaves outside the city or on the water also capture attention. Food, authenticity and waterfront — is there a more compelling combo?

Charlotte, North Carolina — Forecast to be a top housing market in 2018, Charlotte offers urban perks with renewed neighborhoods, new towers and major sports teams without the big-city hassle. Investors, developers, retirees and millennials are all taking notice. An international airport and a temperate climate place this city in the major league.

Darien, Connecticut — Experts anticipate interest in suburban towns with easy access to major metros to grow this year, and Darien is a good example. Homes that are priced right and close to the water sell quickly. Recent ultra sales in nearby Greenwich bring more high-end focus to Connecticut suburbs.

Las Vegas, Nevada — Not too

long ago, some predicted that it would take decades, if ever, for Las Vegas to bounce back from the recession. Today, it tops Realtor.com’s list of the best housing markets for 2018.  While a few segments still play catch up, luxury in Las Vegas is back full force with new ultra-lux properties in a range of prices. Architecturally, many are innovative showstoppers.  

Maui, Hawaii — More visitors return to Maui than any other Hawaiian island. The number of private jets on the tarmac at Kahului Airport, condominiums asking $25 million and a recent $40 million home sale attest to Maui’s luxury charisma. Montage Residences Kapalua Bay with $54 million in sales in 2017 set the bar for resort residences.

“We have seen value increase, but what we have seen of significance is the number of luxury home sales in our marketplace has really grown year over year, each of the past three years,” says broker Peggy Hoag.

Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota — More than Super Bowl LII adds to hubbub in downtown Minneapolis. The boom includes a new 120-block downtown neighborhood anchored by a new stadium, home to the Vikings, and a five-block Wells Fargo mixed-use complex. Offering a higher quality of life at an affordable price, Minneapolis tops Urban Land’s outlook for the Midwest.

Nashville, Tennessee — Once considered a second-tier city, this music hub is now a real estate superstar. Nashville was one of eight metros showing inventory gains in October. Buyers responded, making days on market in November among the

lowest in the country. Nashville appears on several markets to watch this year, making it more than a good bet for 2018.

New York City’s Northern New Jersey suburbs — Developers are eyeing submarkets adjacent to major metros, and towns in Northern New Jersey are in their sights. Already, the region is home to some of the priciest ZIP codes in the country. Manhattan is less than 30 minutes away, and estates here greatly appeal to celebrities thanks to lifestyle and privacy.

Newport Beach, California — Slim inventories make tear downs prized properties here. Developers look for properties to tear down and build new product that appeals to high-end clients who can come in and customize. RE/MAX broker Jeff Grice said more agents are

working with these builders, and his brokerage recently listed a property in the process of being rebuilt for $8.8 million that sold within 11 days. “I foresee this getting bigger and bigger in 2018,” he says.

Orlando, Florida — Florida attracts more international buyers than any other U.S. state and more than Mickey Mouse makes this city a top destination for global buyers in Florida. New luxury enclaves are being developed including more properties in Lake Nona by noted architects.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania — Inventory is the story here, but one of more rather than less inventory as new luxury rentals and residences come online in Center City. For single-family residences, demand still exceeds supply. Slow and steady

describes a continued influx of newcomers to the city, the second greatest among U.S. secondary markets.

Portland, Oregon — A slim inventory has pushed prices up by almost 10 percent, but low housing prices compared to Vancouver and San Francisco bring newcomers, as does a growing tech presence. Luxury here is on a steady growth path. “We have seen value increase, but what we have seen of significance is the number of luxury home sales in our marketplace has really grown year over year, each of the past three years,” says local broker Peggy Hoag.

San Diego, California — Luxury is not new here, but the cachet of this Pacific star continues to expand. There is no better testimony than the inclusion of San Diego on Christie’s list of

the top 10 fastest growing luxury markets. Luxury has expanded downtown with artful new towers and large-scale developments include North Embarcadero Esplanade.

San Jose, California — The heart of Silicon Valley led the country in price growth with a year-over-year price increase of 19.2 percent in October with 76.3 percent of homes selling above list price. But don’t expect any cooling here until inventory pressures are relieved with more homes in the market.

Seattle, Washington — It’s no surprise Seattle leads ULI’s list of markets to watch. At year end, the typical home was snapped up in just 10 days, making it the fastest market in the country. Upscale properties are in demand thanks to international interest and home-grown tech wealth.

Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com

Style Selector
Select the layout
Choose the theme
Preset colors
No Preset
Select the pattern