Thermador Kicks Off Fourth Kitchen Design Challenge

Thermador, the iconic luxury home and kitchen appliance brand, is kicking off its fourth Kitchen Design Challenge, with new categories and prizes, allowing professional designers, builders, architects, remodelers, kitchen dealers and — for the first time in Thermador contest history — students to get involved. 

All 44 of the regional winners will also win a trip for two to the exclusive gala in Southern California in 2020, where the national winners will be announced.

Image courtesy of Marc Thee

Image courtesy of Ili Hidalgo

“When it comes to marrying groundbreaking innovation and stunning design, Thermador leads the industry — empowering consumers and trade professionals to make bold statements throughout the home,” said Beatriz Sandoval, director of brand marketing for Thermador.

Encouraging the established and flourishing design-build communities to showcase their creativity in any design style, this year’s Kitchen Design Challenge aims to attract the most innovative projects yet, with four all-new categories for submission: Exceptional Kitchen, Compact Kitchen Suite, Original Innovator/Out of the Box Space and the Student Concept Kitchen.

For Exceptional Kitchen, one national winner will receive a $25,000 grand prize, one second-place winner will receive a $15,000 prize, and one third-place winner will receive a $10,000 prize.

In the Compact Kitchen Suite category, the national winner will receive a grand prize of $5,000 for crafting a culinary space within 200 square feet and containing at least three primary Thermador products.

Image courtesy of Constance Riik

Image courtesy of Marc Thee

 

The national winner of the Original Innovator/Out of the Box Space will receive a $5,000 prize for designing a space outside of the kitchen such as a wet bar, personal gym, wine cellar or game room. The space must have at least two Thermador products.

And for the first time, the Thermador Kitchen Design challenge is including students in the competition. In the Student Concept Kitchen category, one national winner will receive a $5,000 cash prize for designing an exceptional kitchen for a hypothetical client. The space must be a minimum of 200 square feet, include at least three primary Thermador products and cost a maximum of $250,000.

 

Two more categories are also part of the challenge, including the Designer’s Choice, which will be chosen at the gala and receive a $5,000 cash prize, and the Fan Favorites category, in which five winners will be selected in a separate contest held in 2021 to receive a $1,000 cash prize each.

By breaking boundaries and the status quo in terms of kitchen design, vision and creativity, Thermador is allowing for others to do the same, creating bold ideas and bringing them to life.

SMEG and Dolce & Gabbana — two prominent brands in the world of luxury — have come together and taken kitchen appliances to a whole new level.

Fun, vibrant, unique and sure to start a conversation are just a few ways to describe the new special collection, titled “Sicily is my love.” The line includes coffee makers, hand blenders, toasters, citrus juicers, electric kettles and mixers, and more.

 

Dolce & Gabbana and SMEG continue the journey that joins their artistic sensibilities to discover the colors and beauty of Sicily to celebrate the authentically ‘Made in Italy’ project under the shared standard of creativity, art, and design. A revolutionary collaboration that has created a new perception of home appliance, no longer mere products, but true works of art.

Photos courtesy of SMEG and Dolce & Gabbana

Traditionally based on necessity and overlooked in terms of style, the kitchen is now a bastion of design trends. Classic, neutral hues and smooth surfaces are a thing of the past. Those craving a spark of life will love these unique products designed by experts and industry favorites that seamlessly weave function with design.

LIGHTING THE WAY

Brighten a space with what can only be described as one-of-a-kind kitchen lighting, by Tom Dixon. Breakaway from the norm with organic shapes and soft edges that make up his new collection.

Carved, molded, and manipulated, various materials like white Morwad marble stand out in rooms with an overabundance of neutral colors and plain fixtures.

Pictures courtesy of Tom Dixon. Link to buy: www.tomdixon.net

ITALIAN COOKING

The brand Stone Forest has been taking natural materials like stone and marble to new levels for 25 years. Now, its new Workstation Sink collection of Farmhouse sinks is seizing popularity with wave-like and basket-woven patterns that stand out among other brands.

“Our popular Wave Front Kitchen Sink, was re-engineered as a workstation with a range of accessory options, including colander, cutting board, and drying rack,” says Mike Zimber, founder of Stone Forest. Along with that, we added a new Basket Weave Pattern with workstation accessories as well.”

Originally designed for comfort, the Farmhouse sink meshes function and style perfectly. Breaking traditional smooth and sleek designs that are typical in kitchens, these patterns prove that natural materials make for stunning, luxury designs.

Pictures courtesy of Stone Forest. Link to buy:https://stoneforest.com/collections/kitchen-sinks

Fancy Faucets

Transform even your most basic household items, even the kitchen sink, with an inspiring, black matte finish. California Faucets’ recently launched Kitchen Collection is “a refreshing change from chrome and stainless steel,” says Noah Taft, the senior vice president of marketing and sales.

This new collection is far from limited; there are 30 artisan finishes to choose from, including polished rose bronze, weathered copper, and satin gold. Settle no more between function and aesthetics. With “a lifetime guarantee against tarnishing the days of compromise are over.

Pictures courtesy of California Faucets. Link to buy:http://www.calfaucets.com/category/kitchen-products

More Than a Farmhouse Sink

The brand Stone Forest has been taking natural materials like stone and marble to new levels for 25 years. Now, its new Workstation Sink collection of Farmhouse sinks is seizing popularity with wave-like and basket-woven patterns that stand out among other brands.

“Our popular Wave Front Kitchen Sink, was re-engineered as a workstation with a range of accessory options, including colander, cutting board, and drying rack,” says Mike Zimber, founder of Stone Forest. Along with that, we added a new Basket Weave Pattern with workstation accessories as well.”

Originally designed for comfort, the Farmhouse sink meshes function and style perfectly. Breaking traditional smooth and sleek designs that are typical in kitchens, these patterns prove that natural materials make for stunning, luxury designs.

Pictures courtesy of Stone ForestLink to buy: https://stoneforest.com/collections/kitchen-sinks

 

Link to buy: https://stoneforest.com/collections/kitchen-sinks

Contemporary versus Farmhouse. Warm woods versus stark whites. The latest kitchens incorporate new ways of thinking.

 

By Camilla McLaughlin

 

The kitchen story continues to be painted in white and grey, but for luxury the narrative is changing. “When it comes to high-end luxury, it’s about quality. It’s about finishes, color and the wow factor,” says National Kitchen & Bath Association Industry Relations Manager Elle H-Millard, who is also a certified kitchen designer, noting that luxury continues to be more about the user experience.

 

There is no better place to scope out what’s ahead for kitchens than the industry’s annual trade event, the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show. Although the focus might be the overall kitchen market, many of the trends and innovations are ideally suited for the largest budgets and savviest design aspirations.

 

Still, Christopher Grubb, president of Arch-Interiors Design Group in Los Angeles, points out that luxury today speaks to multiple tiers in the market. “Luxury doesn’t have to be about cost. Luxury is an experience, and at every price level people want luxury finishes.”

 

White and grey remain the preferred color schemes according to the vast majority of design experts and industry professionals responding to NKBA’s annual trends survey. Still, anyone walking the KBIS show floor this January couldn’t help but notice that wood in medium to light tones was very much in evidence, either for cabinets — especially in contemporary designs — or as an accent. “I am seeing a lot of movement because grey and white have been so popular. I am seeing wood tones come back, which is kind of nice. We haven’t seen that in a while,” observes Grubb. The emergence of wood, either as a primary finish or as an element in a design scheme, reflects a subtle shift and growing desire to integrate an organic feeling.

 

Typically, styles gain or lose momentum over an interval of several years. This year, Farmhouse suddenly jumped to the top in the NKBA survey with 79 percent of design professionals characterizing it as “trendy” or “very trendy.” This eclectic style mixes white with warm metals and mellow weathered wood. Reclaimed wood beams and hardwood flooring along with barn doors and apron sinks enhance the Farmhouse sensibility.

 

Transitional, which combines clean lines and streamlined traditional details, was the second most preferred style. Main elements of this style include quartz countertops and wood floors.

 

Overall, for countertops in every style, H-Millard says, “quartz is where it’s at today;” 94 percent of professionals surveyed agree. Hardwood was the preferred flooring, according to 78 percent of respondents.

 

Contemporary, defined by linear forms with flat-front doors and frameless cabinets, followed as the third-most-preferred style. Hallmarks include open shelving, clean lines and appliances that meld into cabinets. It’s important to note the narrow spread in the survey between Farmhouse at 79 percent and Contemporary at 73 percent.

 

Dark tones continue to find their way into kitchens in faucets, hardware and cabinets, sometimes as a contrast with white. For cabinets, blue is emerging, and black is gaining traction for both faucets and cabinets. Glossy finishes are out; matte is trending. A matte surface, combined with processes that highlight grain and create a textural finish, imparts softness and depth that creates almost a tactile sense. It’s not an overstatement to call this “the new black.”

 

The desire for customized storage shifts more attention to what’s inside cabinets and drawers, especially in the high end. Every year manufacturers expand the number of inserts and products designed to enhance organization, meet everyday cooking requirements and adapt kitchens for a range of cuisines, special interests and abilities.

 

“One of the things that came out of the luxury custom movement is really creating an experience for the user,” says H-Millard, who sees more and more companies tapping into the human touch, offering ways to customize products.

 

This year, Elkay introduced an option offering various front panels for their farmhouse sinks, which allows consumers to change the look of the sink. Pops of color are another hallmark of high-end kitchens, and H-Millard says a growing trend is the use of bold colors to make large gas ranges the focal point of a kitchen. Often too, manufacturers give consumers ways to change the look with panels in multiple colors that can be switched out. “They are making new colors every year. There are so many options to choose from in bold pops of colors, everything from knobs, materials and finishes. That alone is really kicking the personalizer for the user experience to a whole new level,” explains H-Millard.

 

For refrigerators, Tami Catalano, sales consultant with Monark Tucson Showroom, says it’s about “columns, columns and more columns. We have just about every brand offering columns now. It’s about who can dress them up more, be more flexible or offer the most competitive price point.” Having the option to create whatever configuration a homeowner desires and seamlessly integrate it into a custom design completely personalizes this appliance. Manufacturers continue to offer new takes on stainless, but Grubb says for high-end kitchens typically the choice is a paneled finish that matches the cabinets, so the appliances blend in and make the kitchen appear larger.

 

Sinks are on the cusp of morphing into the most versatile product in the kitchen. Not only are large format styles in demand, but manufacturers offer many ways to configure a sink along with accessories that maximize function. Often a sink can be combined with under-cabinet refrigeration. An induction burner adds an option to cook pasta or lobster next to the sink. Multiple bowls also make the sink a spot to ice drinks or seafood. H-Millard says, “This is a whole new way of thinking, which will drive new traffic patterns in the kitchen.” Even the traditional work triangle is being tweaked by large islands. A standard U- or L-shaped plan is now focused on the island, and H-Millard expects this to change the configuration of cabinetry. “It is also going to change how people look at functionality in their kitchens,” she says. Mid-height cabinets should gain traction.

 

For next-generation kitchens, look for a growing interest in wellness and freshness to spark a new wave of innovations.  

 

Photos courtesy of Laurent Levant Interior / Dave Bryce Photography, istockphoto.com / Hikesterson, Taryn Emerson Interiors / Jared Bumgarner, Haffle America Co., Mike Tuell, Arch Interiors / Greg Weiner Photography

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2017 edition of The High End magazine. For more information about The High End, click here.

Suddenly obsessed with coffee, Americans are becoming as selective about the quality of their beans, equipment and tableware as their counterparts in Italy. 

By Roger Grody

Tom Dixon Brew Cafetiere

Kees van der Westen Speedster

Lux/Eros espresso cup and saucer

Photo courtesy Consort-Design.com

As luxury homeowners increasingly desire to master their own barista skills, demand for high-end products for home kitchens is skyrocketing. Coffee aficionados now enjoy many ways of transforming an ordinary cup of Joe into a work of art. 

Handcrafted in Florence, Italy, La Marzocco espresso machines are coveted by professional baristas worldwide, and the company’s Linea Mini ($4,500) is specifically designed for the home. “With the introduction of Linea Mini, we now have a professional-quality machine for anyone interested in creating a café experience in their kitchen,” says Kent Bakke, CEO of La Marzocco International. With a design based on the iconic La Marzocco machines used by the pros, this version is compact (i.e. counter-friendly) and turns out a perfect latte. 

Slayer Espresso has earned a cult-like following that appreciates both the performance and aesthetics of its espresso machines. The Slayer Single Group, the company’s model for the home, features dual boilers and a touchscreen that assists in temperature control and flavor profiling, resulting in espresso with great body and a rich crema. Peruvian walnut accents and custom colors or finishes give this machine the sexy looks of an Italian sports car, yet is built by artisans in Seattle. The hefty price tag of $8,500 is no deterrent to those who have a passion for espresso. “Let’s face it, espresso equipment options have been around for a long time and everyone has some form of so-called espresso maker in their gadget collection,” says Slayer Espresso founder and CEO Jason Prefontaine. “Trust me, our espresso machine with flavor profiling, needle valve technology will forever change your coffee ritual…. Don’t be surprised if you end up loving coffee like we do,” he adds.

An exclusive Dutch brand renowned for its edgy industrial designs, Kees van der Westen offers the Speedster for home use, loaded with bespoke options. Inspired by automotive and motorcycle construction, this pricy toy (approximately $13,000) delivers professional-quality espresso drinks and will definitely be noticed by your guests. 

Coffee is not simply about roasted beans and steamed milk, so luxurious accoutrements are essential. The MOOD collection by Christofle, the venerable French manufacturer of elegant tableware and accessories, presents a set of six espresso spoons — clad in silver ($360) or gilded in 18-carat rose gold ($650) — in a gleaming egg-shaped chest. These spoons are just the kind of accessories to elevate any perfectly crafted cup of espresso. 

Among other fashionable coffee-related accessories, British designer Tom Dixon has created this cafetière, more commonly referred to as a French press. With a modern unfussy aesthetic, the gleaming copper-finished stainless steel body is classic Dixon, and its heat-resistant handle is artfully functional. Many connoisseurs believe the best way to enjoy coffee at home — short of purchasing one of the espresso machines featured on these pages — is by small-batch brewing in one of these low-tech devices. Besides, setting a French press on a dinner party table quietly announces a host’s sense of sophistication and elegance. This product ($210) is available at British online retailer Amara, where founder/creative director Sam Hood has assembled an international collection of designer accessories for the home.

Unique espresso cups and saucers ($50) by Lux/Eros, the ceramics brand from designer Desanka Fasiska, feature an elegant rusticity. They are hand-carved and hand-glazed to order in California, with no two pieces being identical. Distinguished by their high-gloss 90-degree angle handles, these products are available at Consort stores in New York and L.A., or online. 

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