Fireplaces: Different Styles for the Home

By creating a warm and inviting atmosphere, the fireplace can always become the centerpiece of the home. With so many different styles, however, it is becoming increasingly difficult to make decisions based on the look of the room. Here are different styles that can be used to complement your own personality and the atmosphere of the overall home.

Photo courtesy of THE OLD CINEMA

Photo courtesy of DelightFULL

1. The Classic Grand Fireplace

For a more refined look, the grand fireplace will do just the trick. The gray and white colors in this living room add to the polished atmosphere, bringing luxury to the forefront of the space.

If the style of the home is more traditional and elegant, this is the perfect fireplace for any room. Although it will blend in with the character of the rest of the home, it can still be grand enough to catch your eye. With its intricate detail and sheer size, it is certain to be the masterpiece of any home.

2. The Simple and Sophisticated Fireplace

If you’re looking for a fireplace that warms the atmosphere without taking away from other statement pieces in the room, head in the direction of a simpler, sleek fireplace for your home.

For a more sophisticated style that blends into the background, look toward matching the color of the fireplace with the dominant colors of the room. Tans and light greens dominate the following space, with the chandelier in the center being the main statement piece of the room. To avoid taking your attention off of the chandelier, allow the fireplace to blend seamlessly into the rest of the room.

Photo courtesy of John Cullen Lighting

Photo courtesy of Brabbu Design Forces

4. The Avant-Garde Fireplace

For the more eclectic, a fireplace can also become a piece of art. Instead of a simple or elegant design, tough material such as metal and less-common designs can add the perfect conversation piece to any room.

This fireplace in this living room adds a bold style that is not just a functional piece of the home, but a work of art in it of itself. The layers of metal that are perceived to have been peeled back to open up the fireplace, which adds a unique addition to the piece. With a bold wallpaper in the background and dramatic lighting, this style is for the most creative and eclectic individual. 

3. The Space-Saver Fireplace

For those who live in apartments or are simply looking to save a bit more space, don’t rule out the possibility of having a fireplace in your home. For a more eclectic style while also saving space, look toward the stove fireplace. This style blends seamlessly into older-style apartments or spaces, and can add a pop of old-world flair to more modern rooms as well.

Photo courtesy of Ludlow Stoves

While the warm weather is slowly coming to a close in most of the country, greenhouses and conservatories are great for any type of weather. Both can add a beautiful, unique addition to any home — but what’s the difference, and how do you decide between the two? 

While greenhouses are primarily meant to grow plants in a climate-controlled space, a conservatory is meant to be more of a living space where plants can grow in the same area. Here’s how to decide which would be better for your home:

Photo courtesy of Conservatory Craftsmen

Photo courtesy of Conservatory Craftsmen

Photo courtesy of Garden Trading

1. Use of Space

If you’re looking for extra living space in the home, a conservatory would work better. Add couches and benches for comfortable seating in a relaxed atmosphere. The glass walls allow in the much-needed light to create the bright, refreshing atmosphere for you to relax in.

If you’re interested in cultivating plants and produce, a greenhouse is a better fit. While it won’t add another seating area to your home, it will contribute to the uniqueness of the home allow those who love gardening to continue their hobby all year round.

2. What are Your Hobbies?

For the green thumb, adding a greenhouse to the home is always a step in the right direction. The main purpose for the area is to cultivate plants regardless of the weather outside, which will keep the hobby alive during all seasons of the year. Used solely for growing plants, it’s important to understand the commitment involved with keeping a greenhouse alive. The space requires upkeep, which may only be enjoyable for someone who loves gardening.

Photo courtesy of Garden Trading

Photo courtesy of English Blinds

For the person who likes to read and relax more than garden, a conservatory might be a better fit. While still allowing the individual to connect with nature, they don’t have to be as involved as a greenhouse owner would.

3. Atmosphere is Everything

The atmosphere in a greenhouse would be much different than in a conservatory. Look toward a greenhouse if a more nature-oriented atmosphere centered on gardening is desired.

Meanwhile, a conservatory will have a more finished and refined atmosphere with its furnishings. While still oriented around nature and the plants it holds, it is much less involved in the gardening process and therefore has a more polished atmosphere than a greenhouse.

Photo courtesy of Conservatory Craftsmen

Photo courtesy of Garden Trading

4. Overall Style

For a more modern and refined style, a conservatory is the right direction — while involved in nature, it is primarily meant for relaxing near the outdoors during any season of the year.

While both add a unique addition to any home, a greenhouse is a niche space for those who love nature and gardening during all seasons of the year. For a more eccentric look, a greenhouse is the perfect fit.

 

Jeff Hyland and Drew Fenton are thrilled to present The Glazer Estate, located in Beverly Hills, California. Totaling approximately 27,500 square feet, the massive concrete home with a modern museum-style aesthetic was completed in 1995, and has since replaced the longtime home Dean Martin originally purchased in the 1950s. The property was most recently owned by late real estate developer Guilford Glazer and his wife, Diane Glazer.

“Offering an exclusive Beverly Hills lifestyle, this rare gem is the ultimate in refinement and architectural prowess,” Hyland says.

Beautifully situated on 1.6+ acres in the most prime neighborhood of Beverly Hills real estate, Mountain Drive is arguably the best street in the city, making The Glazer Estate a world-class home in a world-class location.

Guests are instantly greeted by a long, private driveway surrounded by park-like grounds. With no expense spared, The Glazer Estate makes entertaining on a grand-scale seamless, with the ability to host over 1,000 guests.

From large teak doors to a two-story atrium and theatrical water elements, only the highest level of quality is showcased throughout the residence. The open floor plan allows guests to flow between the grand formal dining room to the glass-enclosed junior dining room, formal living room, and an exceptional water lounge surrounded by ponds on all sides.

The lavish master retreat is a world unto itself, with dual baths and closets. Other standout amenities include indoor and outdoor pools as well as a ballroom.

Photos courtesy of Jim Bartsch

With a sleek, modern style becoming the new trend in home design, chandelier makers are turning from the traditional designs to modern light fixtures instead. Not only do they add an elegant and modern piece to the room, but they’re becoming pieces of art in their own right. 

The creativity that goes into designing and manufacturing these modern chandeliers is pushing the boundaries on the line that constitutes furniture and works of art. With that said, here are some tips on choosing which modern chandelier is best for you:

Photo courtesy of Covet NYC

Photo courtesy of DelightFULL

1. Get Creative with Material

With any modern chandelier, the material matters. Getting creative with the material used to create the chandelier can add a great addition to the room’s decor. Creativity is proven to go a long way in designing the perfect modern chandelier.

The Botti pendant lamp, inspired by the American trumpet player Chris Botti, adds a fun twist by using trumpets as the main material of the chandelier. While still luxurious in its style and design, it adds personality and a conversation piece to the space. While the chandelier is more retro in its style, using a creative material and thinking outside of the box can be beneficial for whichever style is preferred.

2. The Space it Resides

Both small and large chandeliers can be a great addition to any space. It’s important, however, to consider the type of space when choosing which modern chandelier to include in it. For a foyer or room with high ceilings, look for a larger chandelier to create a major focal point. In spaces like dining and living rooms, a smaller chandelier will still be a work of art, yet it won’t take away from the rest of the design in the space.

Photos courtesy of Muse Residences

In recent years, more and more hotels and apartment buildings are getting rid of the traditional designs and replacing them with modern and sophisticated styles instead. The modern chandelier in this residential building is certainly the focal point, simply for its sheer size and elegance. When visitors and residents walk into the building, they are in awe of its design. 

Photos courtesy of DelightFULL

3. The Lighting

In terms of lighting, either a dramatic flair or a softer hue can be a great addition to any space. While the design and material of chandeliers can be similar, the lighting can make a major difference in the atmosphere in the space.

 

While the first chandelier provides a dramatic light in a darker room, the second provides a more subtle light in a room ample natural light. Both, however, add to the design and atmosphere of the space.

4. A Work of Art

Regardless of the material, design and lighting, it’s crucial to remember the creativity a modern chandelier allows. Whether it’s above a dining table, in the living room as a statement piece or the focal point of the foyer, modern chandeliers aren’t simply light fixtures anymore — they’re works of art.

Photo courtesy of The Alyn

Wellness may be a hot topic, but not everyone is sure what it means.

Every year one topic seems to dominate real estate. This year it’s wellness. Yet, if you ask designers and architects what comprises wellness in he home you are apt to get a variety of responses ranging from connections to nature to spaces for meditation or yoga to air quality. Some might point to certifications such as Wellness Within Your Walls or the WELL Building Standard or biophilic design. Others say LEED and other green certifications address wellness.

“I think health and wellness is still in the ‘public education’ stage of what it means. All last year you’re hearing it more and more and more. But I still think it’s educating the designer,” and the public, says Beverly Hills designer Christopher Grubb, president of Arch-Interiors Design Group. Designers often understand the term as it applies to LEED accreditation or to aging in place, but not necessarily the overall concept.

“It might mean one thing to one person and something else to another,” says designer Allie Mann with Case Architects and Remodelers in Washington, D.C., noting that some might be caught up in the movement without fully understanding it.

“I think that this is really being driven by a lot of consumer behavior. When it comes to the builder-developer world, I think our consumers are much more educated. I think they know what they want. They just don’t know how to get there,” says Angela Harris, creative director and principal of TRIO, an award-winning, market-driven, full-service interior design firm in Denver.

“Health and wellness is a new frontier for all of us, says Jacob Atalla, vice president of sustainability for KB Home. KB Home, along with Hanley Wood, KTGY Architects and Delos, a tech and wellness company, created a concept home outside of Las Vegas in Henderson, Nevada, to illustrate what a home designed with wellness as a core value looks like and how it functions. “It is the home story of the future,” he says.

Even though wellness seems to have suddenly burst onto the housing scene in the last year, the idea of connecting home to health is not new. More than 20 years ago, health issues potentially linked to building materials and toxic conditions such as black mold gained attention, giving rise to the term sick building syndrome. Since then, awareness of the relationship between the built environment and health has been growing. A decade ago, new technologies led to the development of products that either reduced the level of toxic contaminants released into the indoor ecosystem or scrubbed the air of VOCs (volatile organic compounds). Other concerns about noise, water and connections with the natural environment were also beginning to surface. At the same time, health and wellness was becoming an important value for consumers worldwide, expanding beyond fitness to include personalized medicine, mind-body connections, spa, wellness tourism and also the built environment.

By 2015, wellness had morphed into a $3.7 trillion industry worldwide, according to the Global Wellness Institute, and climbed an additional 6.4 percent annually to reach $4.2 trillion in 2017. One of the fastest growing sectors in the wellness space is a category called Wellness Lifestyle Real Estate, which includes everything in the built environment that incorporates wellness elements in design, construction, amenities and service. In addition to physical well-being, wellness real estate also addresses social wellness and mental, emotional and spiritual wellness.

The biggest difference between homes designed to promote wellness and homes that address air quality or other environmental factors that impact physical health is that wellness is integral to the design and permeates every aspect of the home from floor plan to amenities. “Overall you are programming the home to be more livable,” says Harris.

Frustrated by the lack of attention to the ways in which indoor environments influence health, Phil Scalia, a former partner at Goldman Sachs, founded the initiative that eventually became Delos, which has been on the forefront of wellness in the built environment for more than 10 years. In 2014, Delos established the WELL Building Standard, which was initially applied to commercial buildings. Over 1,200 projects in 45 countries, across over 250 million square feet of commercial real estate, fall under the WELL umbrella. The WELL standard focuses on seven categories of building performance: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind. Additionally, it takes connections between a building and the surroundings into consideration.

During groundbreaking work on EcoManor, the first LEED Gold certified single-family residence in the U.S., designer Jillian Pritchard Cooke discovered that both consumers and design and construction professionals lacked accurate information on how to reduce toxins in the interior environment. That was the inspiration for Wellness Within Your Walls, another wellness certification that offers education on building and designing healthier interior environments. The focus is on materials both for construction and also furnishings and finishes.

Another more recent wellness initiative centers around the principles of biophilic design and the benefits of bringing natural elements into buildings. In 2016, Amanda Sturgeon, a biophilic design expert and CEO of the International Living Future Institute spearheaded the Biophilic Design Initiative. In addition to designers, builders and architects, current proponents include tech companies who have added natural elements to buildings to increase productivity and reduce stress for workers.

This year, it’s fair to say wellness is coming home as attention shifts from commercial to residential applications. The KB ProjeKt Home takes wellness in residential structures to the next level. Not only are established practices regarding connections with the outdoors, indoor toxins and air quality embedded in the design, but a synergy with smart home tech transforms wellness from a passive attribute into one that is active.

“The motivation was to examine how we can make the home healthier and at the same time how do we engage that home in partnering with the occupants, with the people living in it, to enhance their health and wellness or engage them in making the environment they live in better. We know that about 90 percent of our lives are spent indoors, and a lot of that indoor living is in your own home,” Atalla explains. Recent research from Hanley Wood shows that homeowners believe housing is essential or extremely important to good health, and two-thirds say the right housing environment could cut annual medical costs by 40 percent.

Central to the home’s wellness quotient is an innovative smart system, dubbed DARWIN, developed by Delos. This first of its kind, home wellness intelligence network constantly monitors the home environment and interacts with and adjusts systems in the home as needed. A network of sensors built into the walls — there are nine in the ProjeKt Home — constantly tests air quality.

If it detects problems with air quality, containments or chemicals from everyday products, DARWIN directs the climate control systems to bring more fresh air to that room. Water quality is also monitored, and purified water is delivered to every fixture in the home. “You have a wellness intelligence system that is constantly doing things on your behalf to increase your wellbeing,” says Atalla.

The system also monitors the plumbing system and alerts homeowners to leaks. Sleep is an important wellness component and the master bedroom in this home is primed to promote slumber. Special noise-damping drywall ensures quiet. Motorized shades block out exterior light. “Total quietness, total darkness, and circadian rhythms help you sleep,” adds Atalla.

Lighting is another mainstay of wellness formulas, both natural light from large windows and expanses of glass as well as interior lighting keyed to circadian rhythms. DARWIN adjusts lights to match the time of day. But what makes this function more worthwhile is the homeowner can change the lighting to produce a desired effect, which means the lights can create an energizing morning environment even if morning comes at 5 a.m. on a stormy day.

A living garden wall enables the home to grow herbs and microgreens. Turning the home and kitchen into a place to produce healthy food is an emerging area of innovation for kitchens.

Social interaction is another wellness component, and community design increasingly takes social interaction into account with spaces such as walking trails, parks and coffee houses designed to encourage interaction and encounters among residents as part of everyday life.

It might seem like a big jump to add wellness to typical new homes, particularly production homes, but Atalla says the KB ProjeKt Home is an example of what can be done. Additionally, Harris says it’s often an easy tweak to add features such as water filtration in the kitchen and master bath. “That doesn’t cost a whole lot. And again, I think it’s just about livability and how you’re programming your floor plan to be more livable.”

Looking ahead, most research points to continued growth of the wellness economy, with new initiatives approaching wellness from the perspective of design, construction, materials and function. There are now more than 740 wellness real estate and community developments built or in development across 34 countries — a number that grows weekly according to the Global Wellness Institute.

Right now, the $134 billion wellness real estate market is about half the size of the global green building industry and projections call for the pace to continue. “But the wellness market isn’t just growing, it’s extremely dynamic. We believe that the three sectors that represent the core spheres of life will see the strongest future growth — wellness real estate, workplace wellness and wellness tourism — while other sectors will also grow as they support the integration of wellness into all aspects of daily life,” says Ophelia Yeung, senior research fellow, GWI.

Whether you’re organizing that shoe collection that keeps on growing, displaying your endless accessories, or if you’re striving for a clean, minimalist style and feel, a little extra storage never hurt. Even pricey and luxurious apartments in places such as New York City aren’t offering much space. 

Get inspired with these storage tips and find the perfect place for everything in your home.

Photo courtesy of Lola & Mawu

Photo courtesy of Lola & Mawu

Be bold and embrace your own style. Even if you are working toward a more neutral style with clean lines, it’s okay to introduce a few pops of color. Your storage is the perfect place to try new color schemes and patterns because they are easy to switch out and adjust with your growing taste and the changing seasons.

Portable, movable storage is the best kind of storage. The convenience of wheels should never be overlooked. If you’re hosting an event, entertaining guests, or simply looking for a fresh feel, storage that can be moved make the process of change seamless. Simply wheel a fun, stylish cart into the next room for all of your storage needs. 

Photo courtesy of Lime Lace

Photo courtesy of Melody Maison

There’s no shame in falling in love with storage space that is not the most functional. A few stacked baskets with a playful touch of fringe is a nice addition to your bedroom or bathroom. The layered look adds complexity and style to your room, and it can still be functional for small items and accessories.

When in doubt, try under the bed. The space below your bed was made for storing blankets, shoes, winter sweaters and more. Built-in storage is even less noticeable under your bed and ensures that you’ll always have a little extra room to stash your bulkier items or less used items. These clever built-in draws will help clean up any bedroom.

Photo courtesy of The French Bedroom Co.

Photos courtesy of Melody Maison

Multi-functional is never a bad thing. Side tables, ottomans, benches, and other furniture that offer a hidden storage section is a dream come true. Forget searching for bulky storage options that take up space and ruin your decor. Find a charming side table that serves as a storage unit to declutter any room. 

Boho may bring overwhelming patterns and a mix and match style of colors to mind but these refined expressions of boho are bringing a whole new touch of elegance and class to the term. 

Choose the bohemian blend that is perfect for you and your home.

Photo courtesy of Sweetpea & Willow

Photo courtesy of ABSTRACT HOUSE

African Boho

When many people think of boho style, they think of African inspired bohemia, namely the bright colors, clashing prints and metal tones that are often introduced into the décor of a boho themed living space. Include lanterns, jewel-colored cushions, and ottoman style seating to achieve this laid back vibe.

European Boho

European boho is a little more refined in its mix and match approach, though strives to look spontaneous. European style boho is characterized by vintage style furniture paired with rustic beaded curtains and quirky wall art. Layers, mixed fabrics, and statement wall décor will make or break this look.

Photo courtesy of Lights4fun

Photo courtesy of Flo & Joe

Western Boho

The 1960s and 70s saw a resurgence in bohemian style, one that was influenced by community living that became a prominent characteristic of the counter culture. The western bohemian style relies heavily on natural materials and fabrics to complete the aesthetic. Think exposed beams, tribal prints and pouffe’s or floor cushions rather than traditional seating.

Contemporary Boho

So what’s happening now with Boho style? Contemporary Boho style borrows from its processors but combines elements of the classic boho styles with modern minimalist living. Think white walls and floors, wicker seating and animal head wall art. Cushions and rugs add splashes of color while décor pieces can range from vintage to African to contemporary.

Photo courtesy of Melody Maison

Whether it’s in the form of art displayed on the wall or accents situated on furniture, incorporating warm tones in your home will make it feel calm and cozy. 

Warm tones typically consist of reds, oranges, yellows, browns, and tans. 2019 has been all about being in touch with nature, and these earthy tones keep that trend going. Whether you opt for deep forest browns and berry-red, or desert-inspired terracotta and sand, there are so many ways to make your house feel more like a home.

We are proving just how versatile warm tones can be. You can arrange diverse color palettes to create almost any atmosphere, from bright and lively, to tranquil and welcoming. Here are some looks to explore. 

Photo courtesy of Modish Living

Rustic Style 

Using nature-inspired textures and earthy colors, a rustic feel emphasizes natural beauty. Layer autumnal oranges, browns, reds and creams to create a rustic feel in your home.

A Bold Statement 

Use bolder warm colors, such as bright yellows, oranges and reds, to create a bright and lively space. This Tumeric-colored soft bean bag ottoman forms the perfect bold centerpiece for a group of bean bag chairs.

Photos courtesy of Lujo

Photo courtesy of Viadurini Collezione Notte

A Mix of Warm & Cool

Add a single warm accessory to balance cool neutrals (whites and grays). For example, add a soft brown comforter with natural green accents to an all-white room to keep your space fresh, yet authentic. 

Inspired by Nature 

For a nature-inspired look, incorporate wood-inspired colors. “Wood furniture and surfaces support warm color palettes. To keep the look from going cabin, limit the use of actual wood and incorporate wood-inspired colors,” according to Better Homes & Gardens.

 

Photo courtesy of Essential Home

Photo courtesy of TOM TAILOR

Retro-Inspired

Warm tones can liven up any style, even a retro-inspired interior. Add a pop of bright orange or red to further your look. 

Raise your IQ as you indulge in these one-of-a-kind amenities. Communities are constantly coming up with new ways to create impressive amenities for their residents and guests, and these communities are doing just that. 

From studying the stars through a luxury telescope, to hands-on learning from conservationists, residents at these communities are offered the chance to learn from the comfort of their own homes. 

Study the Stars in Style

As you are perched atop a protected hilltop, set up a telescope and take in the stars at Headwaters — a tech-inflected home community developed by Freehold Communities.

The structure has been carefully deconstructed to become the setting for a stargazing amphitheater. Astronomers from the University of Texas frequently gather with Headwaters families to create a high-touch, outdoor classroom for residents to learn about celestial events — eclipses, meteor showers and supermoons.

Located in Dripping Springs, Texas, the Headwaters integrates 1,000 homes within expanses of natural habitat, eight miles of walking trails, as well as five protected hilltops.

Photos courtesy of Freehold Communities

Learn from Onsite Conservationists

With thousands of acres of unspoiled nature and 32 miles of riverfront, Palmetto Bluff offers a natural classroom where teachers — onsite conservationists and guides — run tours, classes, workshops and field trips open to all residents of the luxury, South Carolina community. Learn about life oaks, wild turkeys and other Low Country flora and fauna on bike, horseback or on foot, or head to the May River to explore by kayak, canoe or paddle board.

Looking to learn about the area’s rich history? Onsite archeologist Dr. Mary Socci leads artifact hunting expeditions from past communities dating back 12,000 BC and even leads cemetery walks that include past inhabitants’ pets.

Photos courtesy of Palmetto Bluff

Explore Surrounding Nature

At the Walden Monterey, the luxury agrihood where expansive lots will start in the $5 millions, developers are launching a tree-naming app described as “Pokémon go meets Google Sky, but for trees.” The goal? To increase residents’ interactions with nature through gamification.

Focus on Sustainability and Environmentalism

Located along Ecuador’s Pacific Riviera in the town of Puerto Caya, Oceanside Farms allows residents to gather for onsite lectures and TedX presentations focusing on sustainability and environmentalism.

Discover Astronomy from an Astronomer  

For those interested in astronomy, Mountain Shadows is the place to be. The destination offers the Cocktails Under the Cosmos Series and the Spirited Sipping SeminarsAstronomy lessons take place at the hotel’s Camelback Overlook rooftop deck, offered to both hotel guests and residents of the community. Each astronomer-led event features a signature cocktail themed around that month’s astrological sign, which can be seen brighter in the valley due to its low light pollution and dramatic desert backdrop.

First introduced to the world in the 1970s with a string of No. 1 hit songs and blockbuster movies, super-star actress, four-time Grammy winner and world-class beauty, Olivia Newton-John, is selling her Australia farm that she has owned for almost forty years.

Olivia bought her farm in the early 1980s after her roll in the 1978 film Grease, the break that would make her a super star. It was her Australian retreat where she would recharge in the peace of the rainforest and views over the land.

Now 70 and with Florida as her home base, when Olivia does return to Australia she and her husband, John Easterling, stay at the Gaia Retreat & Spa which she co-owns. Hoping to attract a buyer who is as close to nature as herself, she has put the 187-acre farm and its French Country-style home on the market for offers in excess of $5.5 million AU ($3.9 million US).

Located only 40 minutes from celebrity and tourist favorite Byron Bay, the farm is a mix of rolling pasture and green lawns with panoramic views, rain forest with a natural waterfall, two dams, a pond and a creek that runs through the property, which abuts the Victoria Park Nature Reserve National Park and acts as its boundary. Over the years Newton-John planted over 5,000 additional trees expanding the prolific wildlife habitat. Grounds include the main residence of three bedrooms and two baths and attached four-room guest quarters, two-car garage and tennis court. The home, positioned on a hill to maximize the views, was renovated in 2002 in the French rustic style.

It includes pine floors, textured entry walls with shells and pebbles from local beaches, and a large eat-in kitchen designed as a gathering spot for friends and family. Multiple outdoor porches and terraces, including a wide dock on the pond, invite outdoor living and sunset views. The attached, but completely private guest suite, has a large living room, a kitchenette, bedroom, bath and additional conversation nook, making a total of four bedrooms and three baths.

With more than 100 million albums sold, Olivia has won four Grammys, numerous Aria, Country Music, American Music and People’s Choice Awards, an Emmy Award plus ten #1 hit songs.

Olivia Newton-John is selling her much-loved Australian farm originally purchased nearly four decades ago during the era of her hit single, Physical. Seeking offers in excess of $5.5 million AU ($3.9 million US), the listing agent is also Newton-John’s lifelong friend Jillian McGrath with McGrath Estate Agents, Northern Beaches Office Australia.

Photos courtesy of  McGrath. Source: TopTenRealEstateDeals.com.

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