Designing Under Slanted Ceilings

Slanted ceilings have made their way outside of the attic, now in living, dining and bedrooms. Designing under these slopes can be tricky, but there are ways to get around it — and even use them to make the room more elegant and spacious. Here’s how:

1. Light and Airy

Whenever you’re tight on space, adding a coat of white paint to the ceilings and walls can make all the difference. Not only does it add a simple and natural tone, but it’s malleable to design the room to your style. 

 

Photo courtesy of English Blinds

Photo courtesy of Oak Furnitureland

The blank canvas that comes with white walls and ceilings allows for limitless creativity. Create a nautical look for a more relaxed vibe, or add bold colors to make the space stand out. With a white canvas, slanted ceilings can do no harm.

Photo courtesy of Melody Maison

 

2. Lighting the Room

 

Lighting a room can be the most difficult challenge when designing a space under slanted ceilings. Many don’t think they can use any overhead lighting, since the ceiling is on a slope. In reality, however, it isn’t impossible — it’s all a matter of picking the right light fixtures.

 

This is a simple yet elegant style for light fixtures that work perfectly on slanted ceilings. The wires can slightly slightly bend, so that they hang naturally.

 

Another great way to add natural light under slanted ceilings is with skylights. They flood the room with natural light in the daytime and add a unique and stylish look to the space.

 

3. A More Natural Look 

Sometimes, however, it’s better to let the slanted ceilings add a unique design to the room, rather than hide them with an all-white hue. Adding wooden beams can do just the trick. When the ceilings aren’t too low, wooden beams won’t emphasize the height, but add a beautiful finish to the room instead. Light or dark browns for the wooden beams create a beautiful, natural look that goes with any style.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Covet Valley

Photo courtesy of Covet Valley

High ceilings have become a statement piece in homes and apartments across the nation, and buyers have responded. The National Association of Home Builders conducted a survey in which 67 percent of respondents in 2018 said they would be willing to pay more money for ceilings higher than 8 feet on the first floor of their home — and with the percentage steadily increasing over the past few years, it’s clear that high ceilings are a great addition to any home.

With so many different benefits, high ceilings can become the selling-point of the home. Here are some benefits involved with designing a home around high ceilings:

Photo courtesy of 90 Morton

Photo courtesy of THREE MARKS

1. More Space

By adding more vertical space, high ceilings offer a spacious atmosphere for the individual to live in. The additional space adds a grander feel to the room, elevating the standard of luxury homes.

At 277 Fifth Avenue in New York City, the 13.5-foot ceilings provide a sense of grandeur and elegance, bringing an elevated sense of luxury to the residence. The light and airy curtains hanging from the top provide a sleek and stylish addition to the grand floor-to-ceiling windows.

1. Dazzling Views

In apartments and residential homes across the country, high ceilings can allow for even more windows, and therefore add spectacular views. With the potential of higher ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows can provide spectacular views of the landscape before them.

At Summit New York, a private residential building located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, the 15-foot ceilings allow for gorgeous views of the Chrysler building with the rest of the city in the background. The sheer height of the ceilings allows for a larger view, adding a dazzling feature to the home.

Photo courtesy of Summit New York

Photo courtesy of DooArchitecture

1. Creative Design

Although high ceilings include great benefits just by themselves, they also have added benefits for interior designers everywhere. Higher ceilings allow interior and architectural designers to get creative with the space they have available to them. Rather than creating a simple, high ceiling, designers have used their creativity to create spectacular pieces that can be the centerpiece of the space.

By using different materials and an eye-catching design, the designers have created a statement piece in the Ritz-Carlton Residences in Miami, Florida. They not only add a spacious and airy feel to the room, but its design allows for an artistic interpretation of the classic high ceiling.

Photo courtesy of DooArchitecture

1. Wellness-Booster

Adding natural light and creating an uncluttered, airy atmosphere, high ceilings with tall windows can increase the wellness of the individual. And with wellness becoming a hot topic in the industry, high ceilings and tall windows can become the selling-point of the home. By 2017, the wellness industry was worth $4.2 trillion, according to the Global Wellness Institute — a jump of 12.8 percent from 2015. And as the industry’s worth only increases, higher, grander ceilings have the potential to be a decisive element to the home.

Photo courtesy of Turnberry Ocean Club

Photo courtesy of Turnberry Ocean Club

Residences at Prince Street. Photo courtesy Aaron Thompson.

Outfitting homes with an artistic ceiling creates a complete, dynamic space, often tying assorted aspects of home design together, from art to functioning space. In these examples, designers inspired to use interesting techniques have created complex designs that demand people to look up.

Gallery-Style Spaces
The character of a home is often shaped by the items inside it, including art or artistic detailing. Helping to define a home’s character, high ceilings within the home allow ample wall space for art lovers to adorn their walls with prized masterpieces. One example is seen in this Artefacto-designed residence in Bal Harbour, Florida, which boasts 10-foot-plus ceilings with customized panel backlights and recessed lights. The Oceana Bal Harbour unit also features floor-to-ceiling windows framing the breathtaking ocean and Intracoastal views.

Photo courtesy Barry Grossman.

Embracing the Outdoors
A space can evoke different feelings depending on the environment, both inside and out. To embrace the elements, some spaces utilize the outdoors by bringing them in. Miami’s Brickell City Centre boasts a $30 million climate ribbon, a steel-and-glass elevated trellis that hovers over the retail center. An achievement in artistry and first of its kind, guests and residents of Reach and Rise can gaze at the sculptural element, as it protects them from inclement weather, captures sea breezes to regulate air flow and temperature, collects rainwater for reuse and allows them to enjoy natural light in an open-air environment.

Photo courtesy Brickell City Center.

Smiling at the Past
Historical architecture is highly appreciated in the design industry, as it creates a traditional atmosphere for designers to either enhance or refresh with modern additions. These traditional styles of architecture extend into the home, seen through classic ceilings that add a unique element to the space. Residences at 62-66 North Third in North Williamsburg, New York, feature exposed, high concrete ceilings as a nod to the neighborhood’s industrial past. The residences embody a sense of character, design, and detail that combines modern and traditional Williamsburg in these expansive homes.
Another example with an authentic ceiling design is in this top-floor townhouse at the Residences at Prince Street, formerly part of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral. The gabled ceilings with exposed wood beams reflect an authentically of the period; existing moldings and details were replicated throughout to create a top-floor living area with skylights and a cozy feel.

Photo courtesy MNS.

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