Reach for the Sky

High ceilings have become a statement piece in homes and apartments across the nation, and buyers have responded. The National Association of Home Builders conducted a survey in which 67 percent of respondents in 2018 said they would be willing to pay more money for ceilings higher than 8 feet on the first floor of their home — and with the percentage steadily increasing over the past few years, it’s clear that high ceilings are a great addition to any home.

With so many different benefits, high ceilings can become the selling-point of the home. Here are some benefits involved with designing a home around high ceilings:

Photo courtesy of 90 Morton

Photo courtesy of THREE MARKS

1. More Space

By adding more vertical space, high ceilings offer a spacious atmosphere for the individual to live in. The additional space adds a grander feel to the room, elevating the standard of luxury homes.

At 277 Fifth Avenue in New York City, the 13.5-foot ceilings provide a sense of grandeur and elegance, bringing an elevated sense of luxury to the residence. The light and airy curtains hanging from the top provide a sleek and stylish addition to the grand floor-to-ceiling windows.

1. Dazzling Views

In apartments and residential homes across the country, high ceilings can allow for even more windows, and therefore add spectacular views. With the potential of higher ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows can provide spectacular views of the landscape before them.

At Summit New York, a private residential building located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, the 15-foot ceilings allow for gorgeous views of the Chrysler building with the rest of the city in the background. The sheer height of the ceilings allows for a larger view, adding a dazzling feature to the home.

Photo courtesy of Summit New York

Photo courtesy of DooArchitecture

1. Creative Design

Although high ceilings include great benefits just by themselves, they also have added benefits for interior designers everywhere. Higher ceilings allow interior and architectural designers to get creative with the space they have available to them. Rather than creating a simple, high ceiling, designers have used their creativity to create spectacular pieces that can be the centerpiece of the space.

By using different materials and an eye-catching design, the designers have created a statement piece in the Ritz-Carlton Residences in Miami, Florida. They not only add a spacious and airy feel to the room, but its design allows for an artistic interpretation of the classic high ceiling.

Photo courtesy of DooArchitecture

1. Wellness-Booster

Adding natural light and creating an uncluttered, airy atmosphere, high ceilings with tall windows can increase the wellness of the individual. And with wellness becoming a hot topic in the industry, high ceilings and tall windows can become the selling-point of the home. By 2017, the wellness industry was worth $4.2 trillion, according to the Global Wellness Institute — a jump of 12.8 percent from 2015. And as the industry’s worth only increases, higher, grander ceilings have the potential to be a decisive element to the home.

Photo courtesy of Turnberry Ocean Club

Photo courtesy of Turnberry Ocean Club

Photo by Giacomo Maestri. 

New design brand LATOxLATO, founded by the young architects Francesco Breganze de Capnist and Virginia Valentini, presents its first collection of furnishings and objects that strives to tell a story of true passion for Italian design. Exclusively made in Italy, LATOxLATO uses the finest materials and refined techniques, all built on a search for the best artisans and craftspeople. 

“LATOxLATO comes from the wish of bringing the artisans’ knowledge passed down across generations to the public,” say designers Breganza de Capnist and Valentini, “and make people realize that in Italy we still have a great tradition of true masters of the art that mold one piece at a time with their hands … Our mission is to show the consumer everyday objects in a different way from the one they are used to seeing them, freed from the constraints of the usual trends through the constant dialogue between art, aesthetics and functionality.”

The duo is usually inspired by day to day life, taking their personal memories as well as the architecture of Italy and transposing generalized design concepts into household pieces. For those looking to outfit their home, both designers say that these pieces help to “tell a story about [the] owner.”  

“Each product has a unique and recognizable identity and is meant to embellish its new home and also bring value to its new owner. The goal is to give the consumer the chance to own a very unique piece that tells a story about him, what he likes and what are his dreams.”

There are several pieces in the collection, varying in look and purpose. The Fourmosa storage chest draws on the clean formal lines of classic Italian design from the 1950s, updated for the modern age.

The piece is in varnished oak, with masterfully carved sharp edges bringing a sense of continuity to the surface. Designed to fit together in infinite combinations, these pieces create a dynamic, personalized piece that can even be expanded over time.

The trapezoidal modules easily lend themselves to various free combinations, without the use of joints. 

Photo by Matteo Imbriani.

1950s design also provided inspiration for Aracne, an unconventional coffee table with an unexpected eight-legged silhouette. Its round glass top seems to float atop the elegant zoomorphic structure, solid and airy at the same time.

Its eight wooden supports, with rounded edges that allow the top to nestle into place with a natural elegance, create an evocative visual rhythm, interacting with its surroundings by projecting delicate threads of shadow into the light.

Precise woodworking and organic design make Aracne an elegant presence full of personality. 

Photo by Giacomo Maestri. 

Candleholders, vases and a centerpiece are a tribute to the Italian art and architecture that inspires their form and character.

The Vestalia candleholder boasts the natural elegance of the most precious marbles, from Carrara White to Carnico Gray and Imperial Green. 

A complex process of water-jet carving, entrusted to historic Venetian ateliers, brings out the stone’s edges and veining.

Their design, rich in tactile emotions and interactive possibilities, makes them objects of compelling sculptural presence. 

Photo by Matteo Imbriani.

The arched ceramic vases Marcello, Massimo and Vittorio offer a subtle allusion to Italy’s Palladian villas and palaces and to the perspectives of Metaphysical art.

The detailing in precious 24k gold or platinum creates reflections of light and motion in perspective.

The pure white of the surface showcases the precious glaze finish and the imperceptible differences in intensity that come from handmade artistry. 

Left photo: Marcello; Right photo: Massimo

Both photos by Giacomo Maestri. 

The beauties of artisanal ceramic return in the Sophia table centerpiece, inspired by the great piazzas of the città d’arte, Italy’s “Cities of Art.”

A meticulous study in proportion, Sophia presents itself as a scale model of the arches and porticoes of Renaissance architecture.

The result is an abstract geometric form, rich in sensory character and vibrant with luminous details that enrich the pure white of the ceramic. 

Photo by Matteo Imbriani.

New York designer Aimée Wilder explores Eudaimonia, a Greek word commonly translated as happiness or “human flourishing,” in her collection of wallpapers, fabrics, rug and accessories. From the effects of the moon on the evolution of the natural world to the impact of astrological phenomenon, Wilder captures the many ways surroundings can influence our psychological state, and contribute to overall wellness.

“This collection was born through finding balance and stability in my own life,” says Wilder. “Once I learned that living to work instead of working to live, along with incorporating methods like Vedic meditation and natural healing into my daily routine, was able to create a peaceful environment around me, I hoped to thoughtfully reflect that feeling in each design.”

Eudaimonia consists of two wallpaper and fabric patterns, Pyramide du Soleil and Earthlight, with an additional rug pattern, Eclipse. All three patterns reflect the natural balance between the Earth, the Sun, and the Moon, evoking the beauty of cosmic balance. With this collection, Wilder introduces a new construction for commercial fabrics, tested for 50,000 double rubs and available with a range of protective coatings including anti-microbial and stain coating. In addition, for the first time, Wilder will offer wallpaper printed in Brooklyn, New York, where she resides and operates her design studio.

Pyramide du Soleil is a subtly optical pattern manifesting the ancient Sun’s shadow and its balance with the earth, Pyramide du Soleil features pyramid and Sun as they represent the illusive quality of time. It integrates pyramids and circles with sophisticated diagonals and horizontal stripes, inspired by the continuous synchronicity that exists between the earth and the Moon.

Earthlight focuses on the waxing and waning cycles of the Moon’s phases in an eye-catching, geometric pattern across wallpaper and fabric design. Named for the scientific phenomenon in which sunlight reflected from Earth’s surface indirectly illuminates the otherwise dark side of the Moon, Earthlight is sure to brighten any space.

Eclipse showcases the inversion of colors in this rug design suggests the effects of an Eclipse, a harbinger of change in the daily life that acts as a guiding hand when questioning one’s path. With a boldness that invokes a new take on a vintage aesthetic, the Eclipse rug comes in a range of warm tones that will add a welcoming touch to a room.

Pyramide du Soleil

Photos courtesy Aimee Wilder.

Eclipse

Photo by ©Dylan Chandler 2018.

Earthlight

Photos courtesy Aimee Wilder.

In a recent Furniture Choice survey of adults in Great Britain, minimalism has emerged as a favorite summer interior design trend, beating out other decorating styles like maximalism, jungle and tropical.

Rebecca Snowden, Interior Style Advisor at Furniture Choice, shared three tips to achieve the minimalist trend at home.

Keep surfaces clean and clutter-free

Based on the philosophy that less is more, minimalism is an intentional mode of living centered around simplicity. When aiming for this look at home, Snowden recommends to focus on clean lines and clutter-free spaces.

“Start by decluttering ruthlessly – eliminate anything that’s unnecessary and store belongings out of sight,” she notes. “In the living area where multiple activities take place regularly, make it a habit to clear surfaces daily. Keep a sofa feeling cozy with a couple of cushions and tidy up the coffee table for a clean look that feels relaxing at the same time.”

Other ways to reduce a cluttered look is to keep wall décor to a minimum, opting for pieces that are simple and streamlined. “A few pieces of framed artwork can add personality to the room and make it feel lived-in while staying on-trend,” Snowden says.

 

Stick to a neutral color base

At the heart of minimalist styling is a neutral color palette — subtle hues of white, grey, taupe and similar earth tones are calming and make a space feel fresh and clean. According to Snowden, the easiest way to add style to a minimalist home is to choose essential furniture pieces that contrast beautifully while keeping within the neutral colour spectrum.

“A white table with a sleek chrome finish lends a striking, modern touch and blends seamlessly into the overall look,” she adds, “If tight on space, get a round table with a pedestal base. Otherwise, larger spaces can opt for an extending table that’s practical and space-saving. Elevate the look with chrome-legged dining chairs that play up clean lines with a high back.”

Another way to make a minimalist home come to life is to place indoor plants within the space. “Greenery is often what turns a house into a home, and when it comes to this trend, plants can add warmth like no other. Keep it simple with a couple of potted greens or hang some air varieties that function as air-purifiers, as a bonus,” Snowden says.

 

Furnish and decorate with simple, clean silhouettes

The best way to furnish your minimalistic space is to focus on decorative pieces that are purposeful, such as a knitted throw for dipping temperatures or a minimal lamp for reading. As for centerpieces, a cushy sofa with a clean silhouette oozes comfort and makes a space feel inviting.

“Minimalist living is perfect for those who revel in clutter-free environments and enjoy interior design with a purpose. Display one or two treasured items instead of multiple small objects, and always pick pieces intentionally,” says Snowden. “Rugs are a good one luxurious yet unfussy, and they double up to section off areas for different functions, while photos bring a sense of homeliness.”

Ultimately, Snowden notes being a minimalist doesn’t mean stripping all personality away “it simply means that what does get displayed is thoughtfully curated and means a lot.”

All photos courtesy Furniture Choice Ltd.

 

Top photo by Steve Henke for Cambria Style.

Cambria, the leading producer of American-made natural stone, is expanding its editorial platform this spring with the release of its first-ever workbook supplement, Kitchen & Bath Design Inspiration: The Ultimate Design Planner. The Planner will be bound within Cambria Style, the brand’s award-winning luxury home and lifestyle magazine, and will also be available to consumers for free download online at CambriaUSA.com.

Part inspirational guide and part project checklist, the Planner was designed by LouAnn Haaf, editor-in-chief of Cambria Style, and her team as a comprehensive guide to help consumers navigate the often complex process of renovating their home. The new supplement illustrates top kitchen and bath design trends, including features on popular styles and product roundups of fashionable accents and accessories. It delves into the most functional and popular kitchen floor plans, providing tips for planning the perfect layout, selecting the right materials, colors and finishes, and includes designs from Cambria’s expansive palette in both elegant neutrals and bold patterns.

 

Haaf combed through her vast experience in covering the kitchen and bath market to create the Planner, which provides invaluable takeaways – both creative and practical – including the following:

 

Find Your Look: Whether it’s the blend of modern farmhouse and West Coast styles of California to the picture-perfect sophistication of a classic Hamptons retreat, it’s important to find the right types of inspiration that emulate you, while staying modern and fresh. Cambria recommends trying out or investigating on-trend styles to inspire your own projects, such as the Into the Woods aesthetic, combining industrial materials and an urban look to blur the lines of interior and exterior.

 

Know Your Pro: Consider your options when it comes to choosing and working with a professional, which in turn will help take the guesswork out of kitchen and bath design.

 

Draft Picks: Lay out all your designs carefully, and make sure all options are weighed when designing your dream kitchen, and which one is best for you.  

 

Splurge-Worthy Investments: Take a look at the five areas of your renovation where you shouldn’t cut corners on spending and why.

 

The 3Cs Buying Guide: Color, Cabinets and Countertops – the magical trifecta to incorporate color, storage and durability into your kitchen.

 

Surface Area: Make sure you select a surface that showcases your personality, making your house a home. Cambria offers a multitude of options, from the inky blacks and soft-gray hues of Midnight Blacks, the classic, understated earth tones of Organic Neutrals or the dramatic selections of Edgy Movement that tend to make a statement.  

Photo courtesy of Cambria.

The magazine, along with the removable Planner, will be available on May 7 through Hudson newsstands, select Barnes & Noble stores, in hotels, by subscription and for free download on CambriaUSA.com.

“The place we live in can and should do three things: reflect who we are, bring out the best in us, and contribute to a better world.”

This mantra is the basic, driving principle behind the work of interior designer Deborah DiMare, founder of DiMare Design in Miami as well as VeganDesign.org, two businesses that strive to create a healthier world and save animals. We spoke with Deborah DiMare who discussed everything from her passion for vegan interior design, her daily inspiration, and her new book titled “Vegan Interiors.”

What image comes to mind when you think of vegan design?

I imagine ultra luxury such as a beautifully made crisp white bed or a fabulous living room with beautiful sumptuous fabrics. The feeling of any vegan space should always emit good health, comfort, happiness and an overall “feel good” environment, a space you never want to leave. Vegan design focuses on optimal health and well being.

How did you come to be a designer, what led you to this career?

How I became a vegan designer was initially from the love of animals that my family and I share. Animals are a very important part of our lives. We also do our best to maintain a healthy, optimal lifestyle. We are very active and love nature. When I discovered the term “dog leather,” it was a pivotal moment for me personally and professionally. … It changed me, It had a deep effect on me. How could I continue to be such a hypocrite? … I did a 360 in my business and refused to continue designing spaces with products originating from animals.

 

 

Vegan design is not just about saving animals. It’s about putting an end to the inhumane treatment of desperate people forced to work in dangerous, deplorable conditions. It’s about saving the planet. It’s about healthy design and well-being. Animal based textiles and materials such as leather, wool, silk, fur, down and treated woods etc. are laden with poisons and toxins that penetrate our skin. Thankfully, today, consumers are demanding compassionate, healthier alternatives in a majority of industries.

What do you think are some key things to remember when outfitting a home with vegan design stylings?

Use as many natural materials as possible — cork, linens, bamboos and blends. Keep it clean and as low on toxicity as you can.

Where would you draw inspiration from when outfitting a home in this style?

Everywhere, everyone and everything. I travel a lot with my family and I soak up the architecture and materials I see in other countries. I get inspired by the color of the ocean on a gray day or the way a woman’s red lipstick looks against her skin, or even the blue spot on my dog’s eye.  Everyday life inspires me. But, most importantly, getting in tune with my clients is my true inspiration. … Starting new projects is like detective work. I have to uncover a client’s true needs and taste. It’s so much fun.

Tell us about your book and what readers can expect from reading it?

“Vegan Interiors — Home Edition” is a first of a series of books that focuses on the beauty of humane design. The book is filled with stunning images portraying compassionate design as luxurious and healthier for everyone from newborns to seniors and simple to embrace. It provides facts about how many animals, workers, trees, etc. are saved in each vegan room or piece of furniture. There are pages dedicated to the future of textiles. “Growing materials” are fabrics made out of fruits and trees that will be readily available to consumers soon enough. “Vegan Interiors — Home Edition” is a beautiful way to show others through demonstration and education that no living thing, including humans, animals and the planet need sacrificing for beautiful interiors.

All images courtesy VeganDesign.org

Elements of city life are slowly making their way into the rustic aesthetics of countryside homes. The modern farmhouse is no stranger to industrial-inspired pieces, which offer a similar back-to-basics look to their brightly colored, agrarian-inspired counterparts. While maintaining the informality and simplicity of classic farmhouse design, an emphasis on industrial furniture and decor adds an unexpected layer of sophistication to rural interiors.

Urban-inspired pieces do not clash with typical farmhouse decor as some may fear. Both industrial and classic country looks share an affinity for woods as the star for nearly every piece of furniture and neat, yet unpolished metals that complement the natural wood. Bringing industrial pieces into the modern farmhouse blends two seemingly opposite aesthetics into a synergistic, chic design.

Here are three industrial-inspired pieces that fit seamlessly into any farmhouse.

Kohler Farmstead Kitchen Sink

$3,150

This 45-inch long sink can be installed wall-mount with legs or top-mount with custom cabinetry. Made from Kohler Enameled Cast Iron, this durable sink is generously proportioned to accommodate large cooking ware. Included in the list price are seven accessories, including a walnut cutting board, a utility rack with a soaking cup and a towel bar.

Photo courtesy of Kohler.

Industrial Farmhouse Wavy Glass Island Chandelier by Shades of Light

$799

Perfect to hang over a large dining table, this industrial-inspired chandelier borrows themes from classic farmhouse design with a minimalist wood base. Vintage light bulbs accentuate the piece’s timeless simplicity.

Photo courtesy of Shades of Light.

 

Farmhouse Industrial Modern Windmill Style Bookshelf by Woodwaves

$425

This unconventional bookshelf offers ample storage space for a living room or office, and the iron windmill atop the unique structure makes it shine as a statement piece. Serving as both a quirky accent item and a functional piece of furniture, this bookshelf is the perfect eye-catching addition to any farmhouse.

Photo courtesy of Woodwaves.

 

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