Desirable Quarton Lake Estate Home in Michigan

This 2018 custom-built home in Birmingham, Michigan features six bedrooms, six full and two half baths and an open first floor with a dream kitchen, study, formal dining room, mudroom, command center and music room.

The master suite is complete with a beautiful view, tray ceilings, fireplace, a walk-in closet, and a master bath with heated floors, soaking tub, and dual vanities.

Additionally, there is a finished lower level that features a full kitchen, bedroom, full bath, family room and exercise room.

The home, listed for $3.3 million by Kathy Wilson of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices HWWB Realtors, is complete with a well-manicured backyard with a sport court and a built-in fire pit on the patio. 

 

Photos courtesy of Kathy Wilson.
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A Rare and Unique Opportunity in Lake Champlain, New York

On one of the largest contiguous parcels in the NY Champlain Valley, this 431-acre farm and custom 8,000-square-foot waterfront home showcases mountain views on 646 feet on Lake Champlain. It offers the very finest custom details.

“From the library to the floor-to-ceiling windows, you feel as though you are outside in a gorgeous glass room looking through a filtered view of the manicured mature cedar trees at Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains,” says co-lister Jodi Gunther of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Adirondack Premier Properties, who is listing the property with Margie Philo. “In the media room and dining areas there are completely different views of Lake Champlain, but my favorite is the main suite with oversized windows that swing open for amazing Adirondack air and a higher vantage point.”

The property, listed for $9.5 million, boasts a totally renovated working 10-building farm, including a horse barn, hay barn, cow shed, a renovated year-round farm home, old slate gable roof barn and more.

It is even equipped with an underground water distribution system to the buildings, high speed internet, and a security system.

 It is only minutes to the ferry to Vermont and includes a 2,000-foot grass runway for a serene and safe getaway. 

 

To learn more about this proeprty, contact:

Margie Philo and Jodi Gunther

Berskire Hathaway HomeServices Adirondack Premier Properties & Adirondack Realty

O: 518.523.3333 C: 518.576.9840 Margie@adkpp.com www.adkpp.com

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The Pinnacle of Luxury Living in Michigan

Set on 12 acres of privately gated, impeccably landscaped property, this French Manor estate in Oakland Township Michigan offers 13,000-plus square feet of meticulously appointed living space.  

 

The home boasts soaring ceilings, maple-planked flooring, supreme stonework/woodwork and four fireplaces. Additionally, there is a top-of-the-line chef’s kitchen with a separate pizza oven, six bedroom suites, seven full baths, a private loft area, and a finished walkout with a lap pool and gaming area.

 

Terraced outdoor patios, exquisite formal gardens, 21-flaming urns, a swimming pool, a helipad, a state-of-the-art hanger, a 6-car garage and a horse barn round out the property. “This private estate is for the athlete, the entertainer or a top executive looking for the ultimate in exclusivity and privacy,” says listing agent Candice Rich of KW Domain Luxury Homes International, who is listing the property for $5.199 million. “This home has it all!”

To learn more about this property’s agent, Candice Rich, click here.

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A Triple Threat in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

An expertly designed interior, breathtaking ravine lot, and premium locale directly across from the entrance to High Park and Grenadier Pond, complete this four-plus-one bedroom, six-bath home in Toronto, Ontario Canada.

This home perfectly suits both family and entertaining with its 4,441 square feet of living space over all levels, over 2,000 square feet of finished exterior space and four walk-outs and professional landscaping. Other features include Crestron automation, beautiful custom millwork, an elevator connecting all four levels, snow melt system, and much more.

“Visitors love the fireplace and privacy of the front patio, which overlooks High Park,” says listing agent Paul Nusca of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices West Realty, who is listing the home for $5.2 million. “This home feels like you are on a vacation and perfect for an affluent middle-aged couple.”

 

Living Room photo by James Dear, The Lighting Judge. Photos courtesy of Paul Nusca. 
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Timeless Beauty in Italy

Elegance, timeless Italian taste, and craftmanship blend in this recently renovated, three-story, 7,480-square-foot, five-bedroom, four-bath villa, which is all surrounded by a six-acre, private, garden.

“The winter garden is a very special feature of the house that allows you to keep contact with nature throughout the year,” says listing agent Giuseppe Porcelli of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices MAGGI Properties, who is listing the home for 4.5 million Euros.

High-end finishes include genuine venetian-style marble flooring in the living area, Chantilly parquet pattern flooring in the master bedroom and walk-in closet, precious Bisazza mosaic in the baths and exposed wooden beams in the winter garden. And, energy efficiency is guaranteed by solar panels and a hydro-power plant.

“The vibe of this home is elegance, mixed with functionality, for a homeowner who wants to live in a property where you don’t want to sacrifice comfort for design’s sake,” says Porcelli.  “Still, every corner of the house has been fully renovated, with prestigious materials, such as the the typical Venetian floors.” 

Additional features include an indoor and outdoor heated swimming pool and sauna.

“Visitors enjoy the outdoor and indoor pool, and the latter can be accessed directly from the bedrooms on the upper floor through a design staircase,” says Porcelli.

Also enjoy a unique view of the Venetian countryside from multiple terraces. Venice, Verona and Lake Garda are less than a 50-minute drive away.

“This home would be perfect for a family who enjoys having guests over, be it for a dinner party, a family reunion or, why not, a pool party,” says Porcelli.

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Hudson Riverfront in New York

On nearly 5 acres with a spring-fed pond in Hamlet of New Hamburg, New York, this distinguished manor-style home offers Old World elegant living space, which flows to the expansive exterior vignettes that feature iconic Hudson Valley vistas.

The interior areas all allow access to the exterior of the home maximizing the incredible Hudson River vistas and use of the many different outdoor features this home has to offer,” says listing agent Angela Ingham of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Hudson Valley Properties. “Additionally, not only the architecture of the home itself, but the grounds and landscape design all blend together to offer you the true feeling of an English countryside estate.”

Completely renovated, this five-bedroom, four full- and two-half bath home features a multitude of modern amenities including a gourmet kitchen, a private theater on its own level and a lower pool terrace with a pool house, complete with outdoor shower and half bath.

“There are so many amazing spaces, but the master suite is truly decadent, and inviting, with its own balcony to enjoy the Hudson River scenery,” says Ingham. “Its luxurious master bath even has a claw foot tub that showcases the river as a relaxing backdrop.”

Additional amenities include a fire circle, wine nook, and a finished lower level with 3-car attached garage.

This estate, listed for $3.4995 million, is full of lush landscaping with full property irrigation and offers tons of privacy, nestled in between densely wooded areas, and accessible from the gated entry leading to a long winding driveway. “This is a wonderful home for anyone, especially a family or extended family,” says Ingham. “It is a great home for entertaining and relaxing with loved ones.”

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Better Than Streaming

In 1932, when the impressive Grand Rex Theatre opened its doors in Paris, 80 doormen donned in white gloves and tails greeted guests for a night of glamour and luxury. A night at the theater was an occasion for fine attire, lively socialization, and entertainment. Today, although streaming services have taken technology to the next level and brought the big screen right into our living rooms, the experience is far from the same.

The Open Air Cinema Kamari in Santorini, Greece is a stunning outdoor theater that is surrounded by eucalyptus trees and offers a variety of locally produced wines and ice creams to enjoy alongside movie showings. The owner, Ina Koutroubilis, says, “Our guests tell us that the cinema is like an enchanting secret garden that harks back to the Golden Age of cinema. They come for the whole experience.”

The Oriental Theatre in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was constructed with details from Indian, Moorish, Islamic, and Byzantine architectural styles and is known today as Milwaukee’s Historic Movie Palace. Karina Henderson, marketing director of Milwaukee Film, notes, “You can watch a lot of movies on your screen at home, but the experience of going into a magnificent building, sitting in a dark theater, putting away your glowing screens for a couple of hours, and letting yourself be immersed in someone else’s story — that’s an amazing thing in this day and age.”

In a world of commercial-free marathon-watching, a night out at the theater is even more of a luxury than in the past. These otherworldly theaters around the world take entertainment to a higher level.

Open Air Cinema Kamari

Santorini, Greece

Open Air Cinema photo by cinekamari.

The Oriental Theatre

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Photo by Jake Hill / milwaukee film.

Foreign Cinema

San Francisco, California

Photo by Charlie Villyard Photography.

Elevated with Flavor

Foreign Cinema in the Mission District of San Francisco, has been a San Francisco Chronicle “Top 100 Restaurant” for 18 consecutive years and is first and foremost a restaurant. Yet the added 35-millimeter films displayed nightly on their outdoor courtyard screen transforms the establishment into an intriguing combination. This pairing of food and film is not a new one, but one that continues to appeal to guests. Gayle Pirie, co-owner/co-chef of Foreign Cinema, explains that at Foreign Cinema, they united culinary and cinematic experiences in an honest way that proved successful.

“At the restaurant, visual media collides in such a way that the aesthetics of the screen flicker easily alongside the vibrancy of the plates,” says Pirie. “This pairing makes sense since the Mission neighborhood, where the restaurant is located, has a rich theatrical past. In the 1950s, it was the city’s hub for movie theaters. In many ways, we’re honoring this legacy while spotlighting the ideals and flavors that have come to define California cuisine.”

Foreign Cinema’s refined menu elevates the experience to an even higher standard. Keeping with seasonal and local ingredients common in California cooking, the restaurant also draws on inspiration from the Middle East and Africa. “Our sesame fried chicken with madras curry and spiced honey is a signature dish we nearly never take off the menu,” says Pirie.

Another example of food and film can be found at the Edible Cinema in London, England, where each guest is supplied with a variety of mystery boxes containing a small tasting menu tailored to specific moments in each film. The element of taste enhances the experience and entertainment without competing for attention.

Inspired Settings

The Paris Theatre was the last single-screen movie theater in Manhattan. With its history and overall classic atmosphere, many were highly disappointed when the doors closed in August 2019. According to The New York Times, the theater was a favorite among locals and tourists and was known for playing foreign films in their original languages.

Although the venue closed, a surprising new owner has reopened its doors — Netflix. The streaming company will use the theater for Netflix-original movie debuts, special events, and other screenings. The venue is over 70 years old and instantly brings to mind the Golden Age of cinema as it sits across from The Plaza in bustling Manhattan.

The Grand Rex Theatre

Paris, France

Top photo from Picasa.

Bottom photo courtesy The Grand Rex.

The setting of these theaters begins the journey for guests and sets the tone for the afternoon’s entertainment. For the Foreign Cinema, “The long corridor leads to an unexpected oasis, much like the rabbit hole in Alice in Wonderland, with a climactic courtyard scene illuminated by the flicker of our 35-millimeter projected films and juxtaposed with the roaring hearth centered in the main dining room, all encompassing the warmth of our community of diners,” according to Pirie.

When entering the Open Air Cinema Kamari, “You will find yourself in a lush green garden, surrounded by eucalyptus trees and fragrant night-blooming flowers. We usually play ’50s Jazz music and together with the decoration and lighting design, guests are already enchanted,” says Koutroubilis.

Glitz and Glamour

It was not uncommon for guests to arrive at theaters in sequined ball gowns and tuxedos at the start of cinema and for many years to follow. Although there are more casual options for viewing movies today — such as the living room sofa — the idea of luxury is still a defining component for theaters around the world. According to Henderson, “The grandeur of our building makes any movie into an event,” she says about The Oriental Theatre. “It’s uplifting to be surrounded by the beauty of a gem like the Oriental Theatre, and then sit down and watch an amazing film.”

Similarly, the decadence at The Grand Rex has stood the test of time and continued to draw guests in, only to convince them to return time and time again. Along with the balcony seating and fine finishes, the star-covered ceiling gives the illusion that guests are outside, adding to the glamour of the venue.

There was a sense of community and conversation that stemmed from early theaters when guests would dine, enjoy a film, and then go dancing afterward, making it a whole night of glamourous entertainment and socialization. The theater was a way to experience and learn about far away people and places, which not everyone had the opportunity to enjoy and is still a part of the appeal today. “In 2019, we brought 349 titles from 45 countries over 15 days to our film-loving Festival-goers. It’s truly a community event, and the Oriental Theatre is always busy during the Milwaukee Film Festival,” says Henderson. “Watching a film in a theater is still a special experience that you can’t replicate at home on your TV or tablet.”

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Sweet Sustainability

Some of the world’s finest hotels have accepted hundreds of thousands of new guests: honeybees that reflect a commitment to sustainability.

In an era when chefs and consumers are obsessed with conscientious sourcing and sustainability, restaurants are turning to local artisanal producers of cheeses, vegetables and meats. For a natural, sustainable sweetener that cannot get more local, luxury hotels around the world are converting rooftops into honeybee farms, a movement embraced by environmentalists and hotel guests alike.

Author Leslie Day, a naturalist who is passionate about her native New York, has spent a career documenting the city’s birds and trees. Her 2018 book Honeybee Hotel chronicles the rooftop garden and beekeeping operation at Midtown Manhattan’s Waldorf Astoria hotel. The book is a loving celebration of the iconic hotel, now undergoing a $2 billion renovation, and the natural world that doggedly prevails in the Big Apple.

Dr. Day — she holds a doctorate in science education from Columbia — was inspired by the Art Deco property’s conversion of its 20th floor rooftop into a bountiful garden and honeybee farm in 2012. The transformation not only enhanced the hotel’s culinary offerings, but brought together a community of humans to care for colonies totaling approximately 300,000 apis mellifera honeybees. Pleased to see other hotels emulating the Waldorf Astoria’s efforts, Day suggests, “This is a strong statement that a hotel cares about the environment and cares about the ingredients they serve their guests.”

Mandarin Oriental Paris

Ojai Valley Inn

Day reports bees thrive in urban settings and notes even Manhattan is surprisingly hospitable to bees. “Before the chefs and staff put in the garden, the bees would fly to Central Park — about a beeline of a mile away from the Waldorf Astoria — to forage on flowering plants,” reports Day. “The city offers a veritable feast for pollinating animals,” she insists. A strong proponent of urban beekeeping, Day observes, “City beekeepers develop a relationship with these amazing little animals and help them stay healthy by monitoring the hive throughout the year.” She says of the challenging hobby, “It’s a relationship that brings you close to the natural world, even in an urban environment.”

David Garcelon, the chef Leslie Day features in Honeybee Hotel, arrived at the Waldorf Astoria after previously nurturing bees at the Fairmont Royal York in Toronto. His beekeeping at the Royal York, starting in 2008, was the genesis of a worldwide “Bee Sustainable” program adopted by more than 20 properties in the Fairmont Hotels & Resorts organization. Now hotel manager at Fairmont Banff Springs, Garcelon is attempting to overcome a restriction of introducing honeybees, a non-native species, into Canada’s Banff National Park.

“It’s not often you’re able to do something groundbreaking in a hotel over 100 years old,” recounts Garcelon of his bee program at the Waldorf Astoria. “There was a great deal of excitement when we added the hives, a lot of ‘buzz’ in the media as well,” he says. “However, the most rewarding aspect for me was seeing the look on guests’ faces when we told them we produced our own honey in Midtown Manhattan, then being able to take them to see the hives,” explains Garcelon, who appreciates any ingredient that has a story to tell.

Thanks in part to Fairmont’s aggressive program, the practice of hotels caring for honeybees is not confined to North America. In London, 350,000 bees reside on a third-floor garden at St. Ermin’s Hotel and in Paris, the very chic Mandarin Oriental — it is located on the fashion-forward Rue Saint-Honoré in the 1st arrondissement — has been honeybee-friendly since 2012. The honey produced by those Parisian bees is used in the hotel’s various restaurants and bars, including the Michelin two-starred Sur Mesure under the direction of chef Thierry Marx.

The Mandarin Oriental’s legendary beekeeper, Audric de Campeau (pictured with his companion on the rooftop of the hotel on page 26), has also introduced beehives to iconic Parisian monuments like Les Invalides and Musée d’Orsay. “Bees are an important part of the pollination cycle and often thrive in urban environments such as Paris, which has been a pesticide-free zone for the past ten years,” explains Mandarin Oriental’s general manager Philippe Leboeuf. To help restore the decreasing honeybee population and to contribute to biodiversity, the hotel maintains two rooftop hives hosting 100,000 Buckfast honeybees, a breed that adapts well to city life.

“Due to the specificity and the diversity of Parisian flowers, the Mandarin Oriental honey has a unique flavor, rich and complex,” reports de Campeau, describing it like a master sommelier. “It has a powerful and persistent scent of red fruits, and tastes wonderfully round in the mouth, with a bright, fresh finish,” he assesses. In addition to chef Marx and pastry chef Adrien Bozzolo, bartenders use the house honey in a cocktail of Champagne, yuzu liqueur and jasmine tea.

  Most people outside the state are unaware of it, but Utah is known as the “Beehive State,” and the Waldorf Astoria Park City continues the practices of its flagship property in New York. Master beekeeper Debrah Carroll, who also serves as kitchen manager at the hotel’s Powder restaurant, maintains approximately 60,000 honeybees adjoining the onsite herb garden. Looking to become more sustainable in its food practices, the Waldorf Astoria initiated the program in 2014, complementing its emphasis on utilizing local ingredients. “The local sourcing is plentiful in our mountains, but we also wanted to have something, literally, from our own backyard,” explains Carroll, who concedes Utah’s dry climate presents challenges for beekeeping.

Carroll reports guests respond well to the uber-local honey, particularly when presented in the honeycomb. “The Waldorf Astoria honey has a wonderful wildflower flavor that works in various dishes and cocktails,” says the master beekeeper, citing seasonal fruit plates, salad dressings, candied pecans, and cheese or charcuterie boards, as well as a signature cocktail called the Astoria Tonic. VIP guests are treated to tours of the hives and garden, dressed in protective gear.

Dedicated to educating people on the virtues of beekeeping, Carroll reveals some extraordinary facts about honeybees that engender a greater appreciation for the house-made honey hotel guests drizzle into their tea. For instance, it takes 12 honeybees an entire lifetime (which is typically six to seven weeks) to generate a single teaspoon of honey, and in order to create a pound of honey, a hive of bees must travel 55,000 miles.

One might not expect 4,200 acres in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains to be a magnet for sophisticated epicureans, but Tennessee’s Blackberry Farm most certainly is. Almost everything that arrives on the dining table is produced on the premises, and that includes honey overseen by farmstead manager and beekeeper Dustin Busby, whose resume includes celebrated restaurants The Fat Duck and The French Laundry. He manages at least seven hives of European honeybees with access to tulip poplar, wildflowers and sourwood.

Most prized is the honey from sourwood tree blossoms, known for its sweet and spicy qualities, a hint of anise and agreeable aftertaste. Busby explains that factors such as time of harvest, weather conditions and even the specific portion of the hive from which the honey is extracted can influence taste. He is constantly developing new recipes for using the honey in the resort’s preserve kitchen and recently created a blueberry-elderflower jam using the house-made honey in place of sugar.

“Seeing the hives and talking about our bees are part of our garden and farmstead tours,” reports Busby. He adds, “More involved tours of the bees, including suiting up and looking at the hives or even collecting honey, are conducted from time to time on special request from guests.” Blackberry Farm honey is one of the many artisanal food products sold directly to hotel guests.

Blackberry Farm raises virtually everything served at the resort, including house-made honey.

Honey produced at Ojai Valley Inn reflects the flavors of lavender, avocado, and citrus. 

The Ojai Valley Inn is just 80 miles from downtown Los Angeles, but feels like another world. From its 220 acres in an idyllic coastal valley, guests enjoy access to the ocean and vineyards, as well as championship golf on site. The Farmhouse — this is a culinary event center directed by acclaimed chef Nancy Silverton — reflects the Inn’s commitment to food and wine. Guests who tour the retreat’s apiary in protective suits enjoy tastings of different honeys whose flavor profiles result from pollination of local plants like avocado, lavender and citrus.

“We’re extremely proud of our beekeeping program at Ojai Valley Inn, not only because it provides us with an amazing estate-curated product that we can offer our guests, but also because we believe strongly in good stewardship of the natural resources of the Ojai Valley,” reports executive chef Truman Jones. Emphasizing the positive ecological impacts yielded through the care of those prolific pollinators, he adds, “It gives us a huge return on our efforts by propagating the flowers and various fruits of the Inn and the entire Valley.”

In San Francisco, nearly a dozen hotels maintain rooftop beehives, including the Clift Royal Sonesta, which uses honey from its “Bee Sanctuary” in craft cocktails at its legendary Redwood Room. The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, ranked among the world’s finest resorts, has also developed a strong apiculture program and Philadelphia’s Sofitel at Rittenhouse Square accommodates 480,000 honeybees on its rooftop garden, showcased in dishes at the hotel’s Liberté Lounge.

The beekeeping operations at these luxury hotels are an offshoot of an urban beekeeping movement that has become trendy in the last 20 years. The tasting notes of backyard honeys, sometimes sold at farmers markets and gourmet shops, mirror the flora of an area, even a specific neighborhood, much like a wine reflects its vineyard’s own terroir.

In addition to mesmerizing guests, keeping bees at hotels helps alleviate a crisis-level decline in the honeybee population that threatens entire ecosystems and adversely impacts food production for a hungry world. Master beekeeper Debrah Carroll reports that 80 percent of all flowering plants must be pollinated to survive, and that more than a third of the world’s food supply is dependent on pollination by insects like honeybees.

Addressing her nostalgic Waldorf Astoria, scheduled to reopen in 2022, naturalist Leslie Day comments, “I’m very hopeful the new management will read my book and bring the bees back.”

Honey from the rooftop of the Clift Royal Sonesta is incorporated into cocktails at the historic Redwood Room.

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Quiet Beauty and Panoramic Views in Pennsylvania

Set on 24 conserved acres in the Radnor Hunt countryside, in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, Chester County’s Delchester Farm offers panoramic views. The well-maintained estate, with its elegant home, stone-and-wood barns and a guest cottage, exists within a landscape of quiet beauty. It was first constructed by one of the financiers of the Revolutionary War, was later expanded by renowned architect R. Brognard Okie and extensively renovated in the last 20 years.

“The property is ideal for large gatherings of family or friends — the current owners just recently hosted a beautiful wedding behind the main house,” says Deborah Dorsey of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox and Roach, who is listing the property for $5.45 million. “And the circa 1795 Pennsylvania fieldstone bank barn could be converted into an amazing ‘party barn’.”

 A long drive passing split-rail fences and open pastures leads to the main house, built of Pennsylvania fieldstone. The entry hall features a black marble floor, French doors at either end, and ten-foot ceilings that continue throughout. The living room feels both elegant and welcoming, with its dark wood floor and carved fireplace mantel. Across the hall stands the original parlor, with another fireplace, a bar, and an original door topped with a glass transom. The home also features a kitchen with a black granite island; a conservatory with a glass ceiling and bluestone floor; and a master suite with a carved antique marble fireplace and French doors to a private balcony. Outdoors, the home features multiple bluestone patios (both covered and uncovered), a pool, and a first-rate equestrian facility and barns.

 “The property is perfect for someone looking for a family compound within commuting distance of New York, Philadelphia or Wilmington,” says Dorsey.

For more about this property, contact:

Deborah Dorsey, Associate Broker, REALTOR®

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, Fox & Roach, REALTORS®

C: 610-724-2880 O: 610-527-6400

deb@debdorsey.com www.debdorsey.com

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New, Charming Community in Brick Township, New Jersey

Pioneer Estates, by reputable builder Arya Properties, features 15 cul-de-sac home sites. This new community will include three stunning models (The Wyndham, The Cambridge I and The Cambridge II). It is located near the coastal area of Brick Township, New Jersey (with the benefits of not being in a flood zone) within close proximity to shopping, beaches and major transportations.

Pioneer Estates redefines the term “Builder’s Grade” by providing: a gas fireplace, custom paint, 9-10 foot ceilings on the first floor, crown molding, a chair rail, shadow boxing, granite counters on every top, hardwood floors on the first level and upstairs hall and a designer custom lighting package sure to open your eyes.

 

The Cambridge I
The Cambridge II
The Wyndham
Arya Properties prides itself on presenting a different standard when it comes to the concept of new construction and on working with consistent contractors that have a track record of excellence. They are committed to delivering for the most demanding buyers.
And, this part of town rarely produces new construction — this is your chance. Curbing, sidewalks, and street lights for the children will remind you that you have arrived at Pioneer Estates.

Pricing starts at $610,000 and there are only five lots remaining!

For more information visit www.newhomesinbrick.com or
call 855-623-2676 and ask for Abram Covella, Thomas Zdanowicz or Justin Bosak with the Ocean Six’s Group of Re/max Revolution.  

And, the Ocean’s Six’s virtual and quick delivery options make it easy and safe for buyers —
with their virtual marketing techniques, which help buyers make offers before seeing them in person. They offer:

  • Virtual Consultation: Scheduling virtual appointments to learn about their client’s real estate goals and developing a game plan to achieve them
  • Virtual Tours: They provide virtual showings to all buyers, which include recorded videos, online walkthroughs, interior and exterior architectural photos and drone photography.
  • Home Showing Protocols: They employ a series of wellness safeguards to abbreviate the marketing timeline
  • Showings and Inspections: All in-person visits are monitored for wellness safeguards
  • Electronic Signing: They offer the opportunity to sign all documents electronically
  • Closing: Replacing the traditional title company meeting, they offer curbside signing for ink signatures.
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